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Course Descriptions

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Web Icon Classes with this computer icon next to it symbolizes that the class is also available online through TVC (Trine Virtual Campus).

A

AC 203 ACCOUNTING I 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of the accounting process and the use of accounting information in business decisions. Topics include the processing of accounting information, income measurement, accrual accounting and accounting for assets, liabilities and equity in the corporate environment. The complete accounting cycle for a service and merchandising business and software applications are included. Prerequisite: INF 103 or INF 113, MA 103

AC 213 ACCOUNTING II 3 CR web icon
This course includes the accumulation and use of accounting information by management in planning, control and decision-making. Topics include product costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit relationships, variable costing and statement of cash flows. Software applications are included. Prerequisite: AC 203

AC 303 COST ACCOUNTING 3 CR web icon
Managerial accounting concepts, objectives, techniques, and systems are examined to provide information about financial and non-financial performance measurement. Cost accumulation, allocation, and variance analysis are studied in the context of performance evaluation and responsibility accounting in an organization. Emerging cost concepts and systems are also examined. The course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 213

AC 323 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I 3 CR web icon
This course introduces comprehensive accounting theory and practice with emphasis on financial statement preparation and analysis. Current problems of corporate accounting and reporting are thoroughly covered, including cash, inventories, fixed assets, intangible assets, and marketable securities. The course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 213

AC 333 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II 3 CR web icon
This is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting I. Areas covered include contingent liabilities, capital structure, leases, revenue recognition, earnings per share, pensions, and income taxes. This course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 323

AC 343 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING III 3 CR web icon
This is a continuation of Intermediate Accounting II. This course continues in-depth coverage of complex topics such as earnings per share, pensions, leasing, accounting for income taxes, accounting changes and full disclosures. The course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 333

AC 353 TAX AND LEGAL ISSUES FOR SMALL BUSINESS 3 CR web icon
This course covers tax and legal topics pertinent to small businesses, including; form of business organization, creating or acquiring a small business, tax planning, benefit and retirement plans, personal asset protection, and estate and succession planning. Prerequisite: AC 213

AC 373 ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of accounting information system concepts. The course will emphasize designing and/or evaluating accounting systems in terms of both system controls and meeting internal control objectives. The course uses computer applications. Prerequisites: INF 113, FIN 303

AC 403 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING 3 CR web icon
This course covers specialized topics in accounting including branches, segment reporting, business combinations, consolidated financial statement preparation and accounting for partnerships. This course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 333

AC 413 GOVERNMENTAL AND NOT-FOR-PROFIT ACCOUNTING 3 CR web icon
This course introduces fund accounting and covers the theory and accounting process for governmental and not-for-profit organizations. The accounting for estates and trusts is also included. This course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 333

AC 423 PERSONAL INCOME TAX 3 CR web icon
This course introduces basic concepts of tax law with the emphasis on the underlying concepts common to all entities as they relate to everyday economic life. Special emphasis is placed on taxation of individuals and corporations. Computerized income tax preparation and research are included. Prerequisite: AC 213

AC 433 COPORATE INCOME TAX 3 CR web icon
This course includes specialized topics including taxation of partnerships and other conduit entities. Property transactions, specialized topics and tax research are covered. Computerized preparation of tax returns for various entities is included. Prerequisite: AC 423

AC 463 AUDITING 3 CR web icon
Auditing theory, objectives, and procedures leading to the auditor's opinion on the financial statements are studied. Internal control and its evaluation, auditing standards, and the use of statistical sampling in the audit process are covered in depth. This course uses auditing software applications. Prerequisite: AC 323

ARC 292 ARCHITECTURE APPRECIATION 2 CR
An introduction to the built environment, prehistoric to modern, focusing on public/reverential, commercial and residential architecture. Students will be introduced to terminology, some construction techniques, socio-legal implications of high-rise structures, and architectural styles from ancient to postmodern. Structures from around the world will be viewed and discussed.

ART 252 ART APPRECIATION 2 CR web icon
Designed as an introduction to the arts, this course develops aesthetic-critical responses and seeks to enhance the enjoyment of works of art. Painting, sculpture, architecture and other types of art are analyzed in terms of the elements of art, subject, function, medium, organization, style and aesthetic response.

AST 201 ASTRONOMY LABORATORY 1 CR
An introductory laboratory study of basic observational astronomy and the tools of astronomy as students explore the sky. The stars, the planets and the universe of galaxies are observed and measured by observation or computer simulation.
Co requisite or Prerequisite: AST 203

AST 203 ASTRONOMY 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the field of astronomy, this course is a study of the planets and the stars and their formation and life cycles. The history of the Milky Way Galaxy and the history of the cosmos are studied, with an emphasis on the solar system and methods of observation and measurement.


AU 103 INTRODUCTION TO AUCTIONEERING 3 CR web icon
A general overview of the auctioneering profession, including an introduction to professional behavior, ethics, business management, and auctioneering specialties. The history of the auction method of marketing will also be discussed.

AU 203 ASSET APPRAISING 3 CR web icon
This course is an overview of asset appraisal and valuation methods. Exploration of marketing strategies and options based on the classification of the item being appraised. Basic appraisal policies of the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practices will be examined. Prerequisite: AU 103

AU 213 AUCTIONEERING SPECIALTIES 3 CR web icon
An in-depth examination of the specialty disciplines within the auctioneering environment. Specialty area include estate or household auctions, liquidations, consignments, and auction houses. Also included will be the sale of auto, livestock, antiques, furniture, jewelry, and fine art. Prerequisite: AU 103

AU 303 REAL ESTATE OF AUCTION 3 CR web icon
An in-depth study of the role of the auctioneering profession in relation to real estate, including discussion of property and land appraisals. Includes marketing, multi-parcel sales, disclosures, and environmental issues. Prerequisite: AU 103

AU 313 AUCTION ARENA MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course explores the management of activities involved in the actual auction process. Topics will include bid calling, the role of the “spotter”, managing the flow of product through the auction arena, record management of seller/bidder/buyer activities from introduction of the product through completed sale, and payment for goods received. Voice use, care, and management will be explored. Prerequisite: AU 103

AU 403 EXTERNSHIP 3 CR web icon
A project or an interactive experience conducted under the supervision of a faculty advisor in partnership with the auctioneering profession. This project offers the student the opportunity to integrate theory and coursework with practice. Prerequisite: Senior standing

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B

BA 123 BUSINESS CONCEPTS 3 CR web icon
A survey course designed to introduce the student to business issues and practices in the United States. All major functions of business are included (management, marketing, law, finance, economics, operations, accounting, information technology) as well as issues facing the business person (ethics, globalization, motivation, etc.) Suitable for students considering a career in business as well as for non-business majors who will interact with the business enterprises (e.g., educators, engineers). Planning for a business career through the creation of a portfolio is initiated. A major focus of this course is on career planning, beginning at the student's current career stage. A career plan is required for completion of the course.

BA 233 BUSINESS CAPSTONE DEMONSTRATION 3 CR web icon
This capstone course will provide students the opportunity to integrate and synthesize previous course work in business. In addition, to the Capstone Demonstration Project, students will be required to take the Major Field Test for the associate in business degree program. Prerequisite: All required coursework in the Associate of Business Core

BA 301 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT & STRATEGIES 1 CR web icon
This is a practical course to assist the student in the development of a professional job search portfolio (i.e. resume, cover letter, follow-up letters). The course includes self-appraisal and career goal setting, job interview techniques, and familiarization with employment resources. Professional strategies are emphasized in the areas of business attire, etiquette and protocol, ethics, human relations, and corporate culture. Prerequisites: Business major, junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor

BA 303 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN BUSINESS 3 CR
This course builds on designing operations and applies quantitative techniques to common business problems, preparing the student to make data-driven decisions. Topics include decision theory, Bayesian analysis, forecasting, linear programming, dynamic programming, game theory, transportation model assignment and scheduling modeling, simulations, and queuing theory. Prerequisites: MA 253, MGT 353 (Same as ECO 303)

BA 313 INSURANCE 3 CR
This course includes the fundamental principles and practices as they relate to life, compensation, fire, marine, and automobile insurance. Prerequisites: LAW 203, MK 303 or permission of the instructor.

BA 323 REAL ESTATE 3 CR web icon
This course is the study of problems of buying and leasing real property for residence or investment purposes, including the principal commercial and financial transactions involved.
Prerequisites: LAW 303, MK 303, or permission of the instructor

BA 333 SOCIAL MEDIA FOR BUSINESS 3 CR
Concepts include using digital and social media in a business/industry setting. Concepts include setting up and using wikis, blogs, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, YouTube, Linkedin, Ning, Flickr, and other online modalities as a way to increase business, marketing, research, and customer service opportunities. Group work at local businesses will be required. Prerequisites: INF 113

BA 343 INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 3 CR web icon
This course discusses economic principles of trade as applied to international business, world international trade environment and trends, world geography and culture as it impacts international trade, knowledge of the operation of importing and exporting, aspects of manufacturing and marketing in foreign markets, and the application of the functions of business to an international business operation. Prerequisites: ECO 213, ECO 223 or concurrent with ECO 223

BA 403 BUSINESS AND PUBLIC POLICY 3 CR web icon
This course includes an analysis of the legal, political, and economic framework that has shaped public policy toward business in the United States. It will include the methods as to how public policy is created and its implications for management decision making. The issues that this course will be concerned with are: how public policy is related to societal, community, employee, consumer, and environmental concerns and their implication for business. Prerequisites: MGT 363, ECO 223, LAW 203, MK 303, or permission of the instructor (same as ECO 453)

BA 423 ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 CR web icon
This course focuses on entrepreneurship and small business management. Through case studies, simulations, guest lectures, reading and business plan development, students become aware of the unique challenges facing small business owners and entrepreneurs. Students become familiar with the resources available to small business owners, by developing and presenting a business start-up plan. Prerequisites: MGT 353, MGT 363, MK 303, Senior business major or permission of the instructor

BA 3113 BUSINESS INTERNSHIP 3 CR
The course involves a meaningful work experience related to the student's field of study or other functional areas of business in an approved company. The assignment and company must be approved by the School of Business Internship Coordinator. A maximum of 6 semester credit hours can be counted toward degree requirements, with a maximum of 3 credit hours for any one work session. Prerequisites: Business Major, Sophomore or above class standing, GPA 2.5 or above, and permission of the advisor

BIO 103 GENERAL BIOLOGY (NO LAB) 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the basic principles of biology with an emphasis on: biological chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, diversity of organisms, evolution, and ecology. A background in high school chemistry is strongly recommended.
Open to non-science majors only.

BIO 104 GENERAL BIOLOGY 4 CR
An introduction to the basic principles of biology with an emphasis on: biological chemistry, cell biology, metabolism, genetics, diversity of
organisms, evolution, and ecology. A background in high school chemistry is strongly recommended. Open to non-science majors only. This
course cannot be substituted for BIO 114 for either science or engineering majors

BIO 113 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (NO LAB) 3 CR web icon
Five basic topics are discussed in some detail: the chemical logic of living systems, structure and function at the sub-cellular and cellular levels, cell energetics, cell division, genetics, and evolution. Laboratory exercises designed to introduce the student to scientific investigation and the structure and function of biological systems are an essential part of the course.

BIO 143 CONSERVATION 3 CR
A study of biodiversity, including the negative impact of human society and what can be done to preserve it. Topics include measurement of biodiversity, extinction, habitat destruction, fragmentation, degradation, overexploitation, and invasive species. Lab focuses on communities and small populations by using GIS, GPS, computer modeling and the design, management and restoration practices of natural areas. (Same as EAS 143)

BIO 203 OCEANOGRAPHY 3 CR
A description of the oceans and their relation to humans. The principles of physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanography are used to explain the ocean environment. Society's effect on the oceans and problems and potentials of utilizing the natural resources of the sea. Prerequisites: A laboratory science and MA 113 (Same as EAS 203 and GEO 203)

BIO 243 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY(NO LAB) 3 CR web icon
The anatomical and physiological features of each organ system are identified. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or BIO 113

BIO 244 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 4 CR
The anatomical and physiological features of each organ system are identified. Microstructure observation and detailed dissection in the
laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 114

BIO 253 HUMAN ANATOMY (NO LAB) 3 CR
The anatomical features of each organ system are identified. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or BIO 113

BIO 254 HUMAN ANATOMY 4 CR
The anatomical features of each organ system are identified. Microstructure observation and detailed dissection in the laboratory.
Prerequisite: BIO 104 or BIO 114

BIO 274 GENERAL ECOLOGY 4 CR
A study of the interactions of organisms and environments, this course focuses on individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, landscapes and cycling of matter within energy systems. Investigations focus on techniques to gauge interactions between the biological and physical environments, field and conceptual sampling methods, statistical analysis, population models, and an exploration of emerging technologies in ecology. Prerequisites BIO 114, MA 253

BIO 434 BIOCHEMISTRY 4 CR
A study of the chemistry, kinetics, energetics, and metabolic pathways of biological molecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and enzymes are discussed and supported by laboratories that illustrate biochemical reactions, separations, enzyme kinetics, and analysis. Prerequisites: CH 211, CH 213 (Same as CH 434)

BE 313 BIO-MEDICAL MATERIALS 3 CR
The basic mechanical, electrical, optical, thermal, and magnetic properties of engineering materials; structure of matter; crystalline structure
and imperfections; environmental effects; selection and application of materials for biomedical prosthetics. Prerequisites: All Engineering Science Core (ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382)


BE 323 BIO-MEDICAL KINEMATICS 3 CR
Kinematic and dynamic analysis of mechanisms. Computer-aided kinematic design. Experimental studies of mechanical properties of structural elements and prosthetics. Prerequisites: All Engineering Science Core (ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382) Co requisites: BME 313


BE 333 BIO-MEDICAL ELECTRICITY 3 CR
Advanced electrical circuit theory. Examples will include bioelectric systems and signals and models of biological systems. Prerequisites: All Engineering Science Core (ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382) and BE 313 Co requisites: BE 323


BE 403 BIO-MEDICAL IMAGING & MEASUREMENT SYSTEM 3 CR
An introduction to concepts of imaging, sensing, and measurement systems that underlie a wide range of biomedical imaging modalities. Topics covered include cell imaging, multiphoton microscopy for biomedical studies, molecular imaging, infrared imaging, biomedical magnetic imaging, X-ray imaging, nuclear medicine, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Prerequisites: All Engineering
Science Core (ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382) and BE 313, BE 323 Co requisites: BE 333


BE 423 BIO-MEDICAL HUMAN MECHANICS 3 CR
Mechanics of deformable bodies. Uniaxial tension, compression, bending, and torsion applied to orthopedic biomechanics. Rigid body planar kinematics and dynamics, finite element techniques with applications to the biomechanics of walking, running, cycling, and other athletic activities. Prerequisites: All Engineering Science Core (ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382) and BE 313, BE 323, BE 333 Co requisites: BE 403


BE 463 BIO-MEDICAL DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS 3 CR
Introduction to Design Concepts in Biomedical Engineering. This course aims to educate students on project definition, and on the design, development and technology transfer of potential biomedical products in the context of the student's major capstone project. Students will learn best practices for designing a marketable medical device, including the design process from the clinical problem definition through prototype and clinical testing to market readiness. Prerequisites: All Engineering Science Core ( ES223, ES233, ES243, ES313, ES323, ES253, ES382) and BE 313, BE 323, BE 333, BE 403 Corequisites: BE 423

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C

CE 3201 CIVIL ENGINEERING MATERIALS LAB 1 CR
Testing and evaluation of physical and mechanical properties of engineering materials such as steel, portland cement, concrete, masonry, asphaltic concrete, and timber. Corequisite: CE 3203


CE 3203 CIVIL ENGINEERING MATERIALS 3 CR
Testing and evaluation of physical and mechanical properties of engineering materials. Origin, manufacture, and structural applications of metals, aggregates, bituminous materials (including superpave), portland cement, and concrete. Corequisite: CE 3201; ES 243


CE 3503 STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS 3 CR
Concept of work and reciprocal theorems. Influence functions and elastic deformations. Analysis of statically determinate and indeterminate structures. Study of the load flow in typical building systems and the idealization of the structural members. Prerequisite: Grade of “C” or
better in ES 243
CE 3513 STRUCTURAL STEEL DESIGN 3 CR
Analysis and design of structural steel members. Column buckling and lateral stability of beams. Codes and specifications. Prerequisite: CE 3503; Corequisite: CE 3203


CE 3533 REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN 3 CR
Material properties. Analysis, design and serviceability of reinforced concrete flexural members and columns. Design and development of reinforcement. Codes and specifications. Prerequisite: CE 3503; Corequisite: CE 3203

CH 104 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 4 CR
Fundamentals of chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, properties of solution, properties of matter. The laboratory is quantitative in nature. Prerequisite: MA 113

CH 144 CHEMISTRY - IDEAS AND APPLICATIONS 4 CR web icon
An integrated view of organic and biological chemistry for non-science majors, emphasizing the importance of chemistry to daily living and chemical principles related to everyday experiences. Simulated chemical problems in the laboratory. This course cannot be substituted for CH 104 or CH 114 for either science or engineering majors.

COM 101 FRESHMAN MEDIA PRACTICUM 1 CR
Individual participation in work at WEAX, the Triangle, or the Modulus, involving at least 30 hours of work during the semester. Prerequisite: Communication major or minor

COM 123 INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRONIC MEDIA 3 CR web icon
This course addresses the development and use of radio, television and new electronic/digital media in American society. It also explores the technical basis of inventions as well as pioneers who fueled growth and direction of broadcasting, cable and emerging electronic media systems throughout the U.S. leading to a myriad of programming choices and employment opportunities.

COM 153 PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 3 CR web icon
Role of public relations as a communication device within organizations including theory, identification of audiences, sophisticated techniques, planning and execution of public relations programs and evaluation of effects. The course introduces students to various communications tools with special emphasis given to methods that practitioners use to promote their products and organizations, including the development of new technologies that are rapidly replacing conventional mass media.

COM 163 INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
Communication concepts and principles are pragmatically applied to interpersonal communication in work, college, dating, family, and social settings. Communication exercises, role plays, and case studies enable students to analyze communication dynamics and improve communication skills employing language, nonverbal communication, listening, perception of self and others, relationship development, and assertiveness. Extensive training in conflict management skills and analysis.

COM 183 WRITING FOR THE MEDIA 3 CR
Provides a brief introduction to the principles, practices, and professional requirements of the journalism profession, but the focus is on discussion and application of reporting and writing techniques for print and electronic media. Work on The Triangle, The Modulus, and/or WEAX is required. Prerequisite: ENG 113 or 133

COM 203 MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
Provides an introductory historical and expository survey of key mass media and popular art forms (including books, newspapers, magazines, radio, film, television, photography, music, advertising, and the Internet). Emphasizes, through exercises in becoming "media literate," the persuasive, often insidious, power of society's "consuming images," both visual and aural. Prerequisite: ENG 113 or ENG 133

COM 213 BUSINESS COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
Emphasis on effective research, writing, and document design in project management, including proposals, periodic and progress reports, formal completion reports, and correspondence. Also considers communication in meetings, the employment process, and presentation using PowerPoint. Prerequisite: ENG 113 or 133

COM 223 THEORIES AND PRACTICES IN COMMUNICATION 3 CR
An introduction to the disciplines and professions of communication. Considers quantitative, qualitative, and humanistic research and theories for understanding language, nonverbal communication, listening, persuasion/rhetoric, and communication context. Indicates how communication knowledge, research techniques, and skills are employed in various professions and considers professional preparation strategies, such as communications portfolio development.

COM 233 INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
Considers interrelationships between communication and culture, the diversity between and within cultures, and both the challenges and the richness of communication posed by such diversity, including within U.S. culture. Topics include cultural patterns, worldview and perception, cultural identity, verbal and nonverbal communication, listening, family and relationships, and business.

COM 253 SPORTS MEDIA AND PROMOTION 3 CR
Examines the various publicity, promotion and public relations responsibilities, duties and challenges aspiring professionals seeking careers in college and professional sports promotion and information will face. The course also includes development of aspects involved in the staging of a major sports-oriented community event. Prerequisite: COM 153

COM 263 THEORIES AND PRACTICES IN COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the disciplines and professions of communication. Considers quantitative, qualitative, and humanistic research and theories for understanding language, nonverbal communication, listening, persuasion/rhetoric, and communication context. Indicates how communication knowledge, research techniques, and skills are employed in various professions and considers professional preparation strategies such as communication portfolio development.

COM 283 SPORTS WRITING 3 CR
Techniques, instruction and practice in news gathering, evaluation, reporting, writing and editing local, regional and national sports news. Topics will include research, style, interviewing skills, how newsroom decisions are made for sports stories and features. Each student will be required to submit articles to the Triangle and other local media for possible publication. Prerequisite: ENG 113

COM 301 CAMPUS MEDIA INTERNSHIP 1 CR
Practical media experience through work at WEAX, the Triangle, or the Modulus. Requires a minimum 30 hours of work for the semester and written mid-semester and final reports. May be repeated, but for no more than a total of three credit hours. Any alternate supervised media experience requires department chair approval. Prerequisite: Communication major or minor

COM 323 THE BUSINESS OF ELECTRONIC MEDIA 3 CR
This course examines how electronic media organizations throughout the U.S. are dealing with today's competitive pressures, new technologies, and financial strains. Discuss how radio and television programming... practices that once galvanized families during respective golden ages of radio/TV...to the explosion of electronic media choices that are currently available to audiences and advertisers.

COM 353 PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING AND PRODUCTION 3 CR
Application of persuasive writing and communication principles and of document and visual design principles to public relations writing and production formats, such as backgrounders, news releases, media advisories, newsletters, brochures, direct mail, op-ed pieces, media kits, web pages, persuasive speeches, PSAs, and audio (ANR) and video (VNR) news releases. Assignments include developing potential client content for WEAX, the Triangle, and/or the Modulus, as well as use of the digital video editing lab to produce electronic PR media. Prerequisites: COM 213 OR ENG 133

COM 363 PERSUASION AND ARGUMENTATION 3 CR web icon
Knowledge of concepts and principles of persuasion, rhetoric, and argumentation is applied through debate and other exercises designed to improve skill in reasoning, argumentation, persuasion, planning, and rational decision-making. Students develop skill in analyzing and planning worthy and effective oral, written, and mediated persuasive communication. Prerequisite: SP 203

COM 373 TOPICS IN COMMUNICATION 3 CR
Detailed survey of one of the major areas within the discipline of communication. The course changes each time it is offered, with the specific topic announced in the class schedule.

COM 400X ELECTIVE INTERNSHIP VARIES (1-3 HRS.)
Elective internship with variable credit of from one to three hours, with a minimum of 40 hours of work per credit hour. May be repeated for credit, but the total credit hours of elective and/or capstone internship may not exceed six hours total. Prerequisites: COM major or minor, 2.5 G.P.A

COM 4013 SENIOR CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP IN COMMUNICATION (3 HRS.)
An internship including capstone requirements, such as submission of a proposal and of written and oral final reports, and requiring a minimum of 90 hours of work. Prerequisites: Must not have taken more than three credits of COM 400X, senior Communication major, 2.5 G.P.A.

COM 410X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN COMMUNICATION VARIED (1-4 HRS.)
An individualized reading and research project in the communication discipline. Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean for the School of Professional Studies

COM 413 CORPORATE AND ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR
Principles and skills for effective communication within task-oriented teams, nonprofit organizations, and corporations. Considers communication techniques to improve meetings, problem-solving, decision-making, and communication climate, while fostering cohesiveness and productivity. Also considers the role of communication consultants and trainers and of internal media such as newsletters, brochures, and electronic communication. Team projects apply techniques and refine communication skills essential for internal contexts. Teams conduct a client-based communication audit or ethnography of an organization or corporate office. Participation in development of content for the Triangle, the Modulus, and/or WEAX is also required. Prerequisite: COM 213 or ENG 133

COM 422 CAMPUS MEDIA MANAGEMENT 2 CR
Experience in assuming substantial student management responsibilities at WEAX, The Triangle, or The Modulus. Prerequisite: Communication major or minor, and permission of both the Dean and the appropriate campus media Operations Manager or Advisor

COM 4281 Senior communication Project proposal 1 CR
Application of communication principles and skills by planning and developing a formal proposal for a capstone communication campaign or project. Prerequisite: Senior Communication major

COM 4292 Senior communication Project 2 CR
Application of communication principles and skills by implementing and evaluating a capstone communication campaign or project. Prerequisites: Must have taken COM 4281

COM 453 PUBLIC RELATIONS PLANNING AND CAMPAIGNS 3 CR
Knowledge and skills needed in the public relations planning, decision-making, and problem-solving process of research, objectives, programming, and evaluation. Case studies and problems apply planning and execution of PR campaigns and relations with a variety of publics: media, employees, members, communities, government and the public, investors, consumers, international, and special groups. Includes crisis and emergency PR and PR aspects of integrated marketing communications. Individuals develop oral and written client-based campaign proposals to solve problems or to utilize opportunities, while teams develop and execute a short term PR campaign for a campus or community client. Prerequisites: COM 213 or ENG 133

CS 1113 OBJECT-ORIENTED JAVA PROGRAMMING 3 CR
An introduction to programming. We begin with a history of computing, and then keep an eye on software-engineering issues including design/test, tools, and risks as we introduce: objects and classes; variables, types and assignment; message passing; inheritance; control structures; the concept of, and properties of, algorithms, including recursion; arrays and strings; collections and iteration; APIs; and object-oriented design. Co requisite: MA 103 or higher

CS 1123 C++ AND OBJECT-ORIENTED DESIGN 3 CR
This course introduces the programming language C++ with emphasis placed on object-oriented design. Students should be able to: Use pointers and arrays; use header files; overload operators; use functions of the standard library; determine a plan for testing a piece of software; organize a program to determine classes and objects; design a graphical user interface. Pre-requisite: CS 1113

CS 1303 INTRODUCTION TO THE WORLD WIDE WEB 3 CR web icon
Introduction to computer science through the World Wide Web, focusing on the techniques of web-page creation.

CS 2103 ALGORITHM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS 3 CR
The theory of programming, reinforced with practical activities, such as animations and demonstrations of the time requirements of different algorithms. We investigate proof techniques, time-space analysis of algorithms, classic strategies like greedy search and branch-and-bound, trees and graphs, automata, and applications. Before enrolling in this course, Java programming is required, but further experience in programming is prudent. Prerequisites: CS 1113

CS 2213 ARCHITECTURE AND OPERATING SYSTEMS 3 CR
The course reviews digital logic, and investigates the machine representations of data, assembly-level machine organization, memory architecture, and functional control including pipelines. Other topics include the functions of operating systems, and examines processes, interrupts, and kernel modes; concurrency, and scheduling; and memory management. Prerequisite: CS 1123

CS 2503 SOFTWARE ENGINEERING & USER INTERFACES 3 CR
This course introduces software engineering from requirements definitions and documents, through system modeling, specification, and design, to verification and validation. It examines project management, software cost estimation, software maintenance, configuration management, documentation, and software quality assurance. This course also examines human-centered development and evaluation and human performance models. It involves students in graphical user interface design and implementation. The course introduces groupware, on-line communities and intelligent agents. Prerequisite: CS 1123

CS 2613 AI AND INFORMATION 3 CR
This course introduces the basic terms and issues of artificial intelligence. It describes knowledge representation and search methods, and learning systems like genetic algorithms and neural networks. The course describes information models and systems, database systems, data modeling, and both relational databases and query languages. Prerequisite: CS 1123

CS 3223 NETWORK ARCHITECTURE 3 CR
Topics include distributed algorithms Interfacing and communication; multiprocessing architectures; LAN, WAN, and ISO/OSI; concurrency; scheduling; real-time issues; fault-tolerance; system performance measurement; scripting. Prerequisite: CS 2213

CS 3303 NET-CENTRIC COMPUTING 3 CR
Communication and networking: the ISO 7-layer model; client/servers on the web; building web applications; network management: security, firewalls, quality-of-service; compression and decompression; multimedia technologies and capacity issues; wireless and mobile computing protocols, LANs, and performance, and extending client/server ideas to mobile computing. Prerequisite: CS 3223

CS 4013 COMPUTER GRAPHICS 3 CR
This course includes both two and three dimensional computer graphics. Topics include windows and view-ports; geometric transformations, hidden surfaces, and file formats. It introduces standard libraries such as VCL. Prerequisite: ECE 263

CS 4023 COMPILER CONSTRUCTION 3 CR
This course introduces compiler design for procedural languages. Topics include formal grammar, lexical, syntax, and semantic analysis, parsing, code generation and optimization, and compiler writing tools. Prerequisite CS 2213

CS 4033 SPECIAL TOPICS 3 CR
Addresses advanced topics that vary by year. Prerequisite: consent of instructor

CS 4903 CAPSTONE PROJECT 3 CR
A team project that requires interaction with users and formal reporting. A student who intends to pursue graduate study and who can demonstrate team work from other experience may be assigned a solo research project. Prerequisite: CS 2503

CRJ 503 SEMINAR IN LAW AND SOCIAL CONTROL 3 CR web icon
An introduction to legal theory and the moral, practical and legal implications of law as a means of maintaining social order. The course will also examine the impact of economic and political forces on social control.

CRJ 513 CRIMINOLOGY 3 CR web icon
The study of the nature, extent, cause and control of criminal behavior. Students will examine the ways in which crime is measured, identify various crime typologies, and explore a wide range of crime causation theories.

CRJ 523 THE AMERICAN SYSTEM OF JUSTICE 3 CR web icon
An examination of the core components of the criminal justice system: courts, law enforcement, and correctional agencies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interrelationship between the various components as they attempt to meet their individual mandates.

CRJ 533 CRIMINAL JUSTICE POLICY FORMATION AND ANALYSIS 3 CR web icon
A study of the methodology behind law, statute and policy creation in the public criminal justice arena. Includes a discussion of the American political system and an evaluation of key public policies that impact the justice system.

CRJ 553 APPLIED STATISTICS FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 CR web icon
The study of data analysis as it relates to the social sciences. Topics will include inductive and descriptive analysis, sampling, and methods of evaluation. The emphasis will be on practical application of statistics to criminal justice situations.

CRJ 563 PLANNING, & PROGRAM EVALUATION 3 CR web icon
An overview of program planning and intervention principles for the public administrator.  Students will review methodologies for identifying public issues, planning for them, and assessing outcomes.  Attention will also be given governmental policies as they impact program planning.

CRJ 593 DEMONSTRATION PROJECT CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
An in-depth application of the concepts contained in the core courses. Under the direction of a criminal justice faculty member, the student will design, research, and complete a project that will then be formally presented to a committee of at least two full-time or adjunct professors.

CRJ 603 THEORY AND PRACTICE OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 3 CR web icon
An examination of factors that impact public administration, including organizational design, political relationships, and the environment, with an emphasis on ethical behavior in the public arena.

CRJ 613 PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIORAL AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
A study of the importance of organizational planning, quality decision-making, and budget management. The course will also examine the methods and procedures necessary for managing in the public arena.

CRJ 623 GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING, FINANCE AND BUDGETING 3 CR web icon
An in-depth look at accounting, finance and budgeting practices in public administration, including fundamental concepts of accounting principles.

CRJ 643 LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY 3 CR web icon
This course provides an overview of several key legal issues faced by administrators within criminal justice public agencies. It focuses on statutory and Constitutional limitations on these administrators' interactions with prisoners, probationers, and parolees. It also addresses core issues faced by public managers in the field of administrative law.

CRJ 693 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT 3 CR web icon
An in-depth analysis of the concepts contained within the concentration courses. Conducted under the direction of a criminal justice faculty member, the student will design and implement a capstone project, and then present the results to a committee of at least two full-time or adjunct professors with public administration experience.

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E

EAS 143 CONSERVATION 3 CR
A study of biodiversity, including the negative impact of human society and what can be done to preserve it. Topics include measurement of biodiversity, extinction, habitat destruction, fragmentation, degradation, overexploitation, and invasive species. Lab focuses on communities and small populations by using GIS, GPS, computer modeling and the design, management and restoration practices of natural areas. (Same as BIO 143)

EAS 203 OCEANOGRAPHY 3 CR
A description of the oceans and their relation to humans. The principles of physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanography are used to explain the ocean environment. Society's effect on the oceans and problems and potentials of utilizing the natural resources of the sea included. Prerequisites: A lab science and MA 113 (Same as BIO 203 and GEO 203)

EAS 213 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 CR web icon
An analysis of the spatial and functional relationships among landforms, climates, soils, water, and the living world. This course also addresses the connections between environmental processes and human activity, such as human impact on the environment. (Same as GEO 213)

EAS 253 WEATHER & CLIMATE 3 CR web icon
Elementary description of the atmosphere: its motion systems, thermal characteristics, clouds and precipitation, weather map interpretation and analysis; climates of the United States. The course conveys meteorological concepts in a visual, practical, and non-mathematical manner.

EAS 273 GEOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the field of geology. Study of minerals and rocks and their formation, within the context of the earth's geologic history. Emphasis on soils, running water, and groundwater. Plate tectonics, glaciers, volcanoes, erosion, and weathering are also covered. Non-lab science only. (Same as GLY 273)

ECE 261 DIGITAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY 1 CR
The lab provides a comprehensive hands-on opportunity to implement digital design concepts. Logic gates, logic tools, Hardware Description Language(HDL) and Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) design boards are extensively introduced to provide different variations of digital design. Students will be able to: Work in a team environment; solve technical problems; Understand switchbounce problems and design a de-bounced switch; Design adders, comparators, multiplexers, tri-state buffers and decoders using AND/OR/NOT/NAND/ NOR logic gates; Design memory cells, BCD 7-segment decoders, flip-flops and counters using logic gates and HDL; Implement the design in an FPGA board. Co requisite: ECE 263

ECE 263 DIGITAL SYSTEMS 3 CR
This course covers and explores the introductory concepts of digital systems using combinational and sequential logic circuits. Digital design automation tools and Hardware Description Language (HDL) are also introduced. Students will be able to demonstrate that they: Understand number systems and Boolean algebra; Understand and can design combinational logic circuits including multiplexers, comparators, decoders, and adders; Understand and can design sequential logic circuits including latches, flip-flops and counters; Can design combinational and sequential circuits using HDL and can perform timing analysis; Understand the memory hierarchy, ROMs, RAMs and FLASH memories; Understand Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs), CPLDs and FPGAs. Co requisite: ECE 261

ECE 271 MICROCONTROLLERS LAB 1 CR
This course teaches students to implement and test inexpensive hardware software systems that offer a user interface, a digital signal generator, a sampled feedback controller, and subsystem interfacing. You will: test a feedback system using experiments you design, and determine if your project goals are met; design and implement a working feedback controller for a real physical system; team-up on most labs and on one formal report; solve the problem you pose yourself in the feedback project; report findings in formal written documents; use lab bench tools to develop and debug code.
Prerequisite: ECE 261; Co requisite: ECE 273

ECE 273 MICROCONTROLLERS 3 CR
This course teaches students to design inexpensive hardware-software systems that offer a user interface, a digital signal generator, a sampled feedback controller, and subsystem interfacing. You will analyze a microcontroller system for timing; solve problems written in prose by showing a hardware/software system that addresses the problem; empathize with stakeholders of a medical device; teach yourself to use an unfamiliar on-chip peripheral from the manufacturer's data sheet; address power consumption/battery life; use a compiler/assembler/ simulator to develop correctly working code; use the UML to aid design work; respect the IEEE code of ethics. Prerequisite: ECE 263 and CS 1113 or equivalent; Co requisite: ECE 271

ECE 371 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS LABORATORY 1 CR
In support of 413, this lab puts students in pairs of triples to explore isolated subsystems from the course project in the usual lab format, and then provides structured time to achieve and demonstrate progress in the project. Students will work in small teams; will show that they can use the tools and techniques of modern embedded systems to implement their designs; will assume responsibility for designing the test or experiments needed to verify their work; and will demonstrate communication skills in formal reports and demonstrations. Co requisite: ECE 373

ECE 373 EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 3 CR
Building on 273 (Microcontrollers), this focuses focuses on real-time multitasking and RTOS and includes a design project to explore these ideas, and the course also looks at enabling techniques such as mixed C and assembly, control of linking, external memory, self-programming, and fail-safety. Students will be able to explain and apply real-time multitasking concepts; design and implement an embedded system; design recovery from exceptional conditions; incorporate into their work complex peripherals like PWM-capable timers. Prerequisite: ECE 273; Co requisite: ECE 371

ECE 393 SOFTWARE ANALYSIS AND DESIGN 3-0-3
Teaches the code development process to students who can use an object-oriented computer language. Students will: identify activities of software project engineering; write a formal requirements document; perform object-oriented analysis of client requirements; use UML class and sequence diagrams to support object-oriented design; apply some software design patterns; implement your designed software in a team supported by a version-control tool; use a professional-caliber GUI library to advantage; and follow coding standards. Prerequisite: CS 1123

ECO 213 MICROECONOMICS 3 CR web icon
Introduction to the theory of demand and supply and price determination in market economies. The study of individual consumers and producers, different market structures and the distribution of income.

ECO 223 MACROECONOMICS 3 CR web icon
Introduction to the theory of national income determination for the United States and other global economic systems. The study of fiscal and monetary policy tools and the government's role in promoting stability and growth, and the causes of unemployment, inflation, and trade deficits.

ECO 243 ECONOMICS OF SOCIAL ISSUES 3 CR web icon
An economic analysis of social issues, such as the problems of pollution, poverty, crime, and the use of drugs. A study of the economic consequences of various social and economic policies, population pressures and related energy and pollution problems.  Prerequisite ECO 213 (Same as SOC 243)

ECO 303 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS IN BUSINESS 3 CR
This course builds on designing operations and applies quantitative techniques to common business problems, preparing the student to make data-driven decisions. Topics include decision theory, Bayesian analysis, forecasting, linear programming, dynamic programming, game theory, transportation models, assignment and scheduling modeling, simulations, and queuing theory. Prerequisites: MA 253, MGT 353 (Same as BA 303)

ECO 323 MONEY AND BANKING 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of the principles of monetary economics. An analysis of the structure and operation of financial institutions and the Federal Reserve System is included. The function of monetary policy within the framework of macroeconomic theory is examined. Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as FIN 323)

ECO 333 PUBLIC FINANCE 3 CR
This course involves an investigation of the role of the public sector in economic development. Fiscal policy and the practice of public finance are examined. Topics cover cost functions for public goods, externalities, and fiscal federalism. Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as FIN 333)

ECO 343 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 3 CR web icon
A spiritual approach to economics, the course considers historical, present and future economic activities, developments, and trends, in a global context, with the goal of answering the two basic questions of geography: "where?" and "why there?". Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as GEO 343)

ECO 363 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
A comparison of the capitalist, socialist, communist and mixed economies, theory, history, and application of the system in selected countries. Prerequisite: ECO 223

ECO 383 INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS 3 CR
Introduction to the fundamental theories of international specialization and exchange, and international payments; the analysis of processes and organizations for maintaining equilibrium of international economic relationships. Prerequisite: ECO 223

ECO 393 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 3 CR
A survey of major economic developments in American history. Stresses the changed conditions and values in moving from an agricultural to an industrial society. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113 (Same as HIS 393)

ECO 453 BUSINESS AND PUBLIC POLICY 3 CR
This course includes an analysis of the legal, political and economic framework that has shaped public policy toward business in the United States. It will include the methods as to how public policy is created and its implications for management decision making. The issues that this course will be concerned with are: how public policy is related to societal, community, employee, consumer, and environmental concerns and their implication for business. (same as BA 403) Prerequisites: MGT 363, ECO 223, LAW 203, MK 303, or permission of the instructor

ECO 400X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN ECONOMICS VARIES (1-4 HRS.)
Credit earned through directed reading, independent study, research or supervised field work. Maximum 4 hours credit. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

EGR 143 Engineering Graphics

Graphical communication for engineers using sketching and computer-aided drafting. The fundamentals of orthographic projection, isometric projection and descriptive geometry are taught. An introduction to three dimensional models using solid modeling computer software is also covered. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills needed for mechanical engineering design.

EGR 153 Engineering Graphics for CE

Graphical communication by means of sketching and computer-aided drafting. The fundamentals of orthographic projection and descriptive geometry. THis course stresses applications of graphic communications, both manually and through the use of CAD systems

EGR 453 ADVANCED PARAMETRIC DESIGN 3 CR
An introduction to the high end Unigraphics NX design software used by many major industry segments including a review of the advanced capabilities of the software. Prerequisite: ETD 263

ES 213 STATICS 3 CR

The first course in engineering mechanics. Subjects cover includes; force and moment vectors, equivalent systems, trusses, frames, and machines, equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies, static friction, centroids and moments of inertia. Corequisite: PH 224, MA 164

ES 223 DYNAMICS 3 CR

Kinematics of absolute and relative motion of particles and rigid bodies. Subjects include; kinetics of particles and particle systems. Principles of work and energy, impulse and momentum, and impact. Kinetics of rigid bodies in plane motion. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ES 213, MA 164 and PH 224

ES 233 ENGINEERING MATERIALS 3 CR

A study of the structure and properties of materials. Materials covered include metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Mechanical properties are emphasized, electrical properties, thermal properties, and environmental interactions are addressed. Structural features at the atomistic level, the crystal structure level, and the microstructure level of single and polyphase materials are studied in terms of their effects on material properties. Prerequisite: CH 104; Corequisite: PH 224

ES 243 SOLID MECHANICS 3 CR

Concepts of stress and strain in engineering materials. Subjects include; Hooke’s law and Poisson’s relationship, analysis of axial, shear, flexural, and torsional stresses, combined stress, shear and moment distribution in beams, and deformation of structural members. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ES 213

ES 253 ELECTRICAL SCIENCE 3 CR

Basic voltage-current-energy relationships in circuit elements. Fundamental circuit laws. Resistive networks and network theorems. Sinusoidal steadystate response and phasors. Power and energy in AC circuits. Prerequisites: MA 134, PH 224

ES 313 THERMODYNAMICS 3 CR

Introduction to properties of substances and ideal gases by use of tables. Introduction to thermodynamic concepts of systems, control volumes, heat, work and internal energy. Formulation of the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics with engineering applications, Vapor Water Systems Ranking cycle, First and Second Law analysis of power plant cycles. Prerequisites: Grade of “C” or better in MA 164, PH 224, and ES 213

ES 323 FLUID MECHANICS 3 CR

Fundamental properties of fluids. Fluid statics. Kinematics of fluid motion. Conservation of mass, energy and momentum as applied to compressible and incompressible fluids. Similitude. Introduction to laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Prerequisite: ES 213; Co-requisite: MA 213

ES 382 ENGINEERING ECONOMICS 2 CR

An introduction to the economics component of design and problem solving. Application of economic concepts from present and future value of money, depreciation, and taxes to problems involving replacement studies and selection between alternative uses of capital. Methods include equivalent worth, rate of return, and incremental techniques.

EM 103 INTRODUCTION TO EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course examines the role of emergency management in today's society. This course will examine the theories, principles and concepts of managing emergencies that impact our communities. The course will address mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery, as well as roles of federal, state and local (public and private) agencies. Analysis and discussion will cover past and present hazards and approaches, and legal issues within the discipline

EM 113 INTRODUCTION TO HAZARD MITIGATION AND PLANNING 3 CR web icon
This course will examine hazards and hazard mitigation planning. The course will examine causes of and resulting behaviors of hazards and the potential for federal, state and local agencies to mitigate the potential threats presented by hazards. The course will also look at coordination of planning responsibilities of emergency managers as they relate to emergency preparedness and the specialty areas that need to be coordinated.

EM 223 RISK ASSESSMENT & VULNERABILITY 3 CR web icon
An adequate hazard, risk and vulnerability (HRV) analysis is the cornerstone of successful disaster management: communities need to be able to identify potential hazards, to determine those hazards most likely to occur, to evaluate vulnerabilities, and to develop mitigative programs in order to reduce the likelihood and consequences of disasters. Developing an effective implementation of the disaster management plan across disciplinary boundaries will be discussed.

EM 253 DISASTER RELIEF & RECOVERY 3 CR web icon
The purpose of this course is to address relief and recovery from disasters that occur. The majority of effort will focus on natural disasters, but planned (e.g., terrorism) and unplanned (e.g., oil tanker spills) will be covered as well. Policies, programs and procedures for managing the relief effort and methods of providing the best return to normalcy will be discussed and assessed. Also covered will be the concept of minimizing the occurrences and damages of recurring future events.

EM 303 NATURAL AND MAN-MADE DISASTERS 3 CR web icon

This course will look at natural and man-made disasters across history.  An emphasis will be placed on the capabilities and capacities necessary to respond to these disasters.  During the course students will explore the evolution of government (federal, state, local & tribal) response through history, with focus on current response trends.  Students will explore the roles and responsibilities of public and private entities in response efforts as well as the costs of the roles and responsibilities.

EM 313 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS OPERATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course will cover the dangers posed by hazardous materials to the operations personnel; to the responders; and to the community. Best practices for storage, transportation and use of hazardous materials are covered. Categories and identification of hazardous materials, as well as state and federal laws regulating hazardous materials will be learned.

EM 323 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS & WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION 3 CR web icon

The course will explore the use of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) materials as weapons of mass destruction.  Students will take a more in depth look at hazardous materials, particularly those that might be used as a weapon.  The historical use of CBRNE materials against humanity will be explored.  The coordination between law enforcement, fire, health departments, and hazardous materials teams will be addressed during this course. Capabilities and capacities that might be necessary to respond to an incident involving a hazardous material or CBRNE as a weapon of mass destruction will be discussed.   Prerequisite: EM 313

EM 333 WORLD TERRORISM 3 CR web icon

This course will examine terrorism around the world and the groups often associated with terrorism.  The “lone wolf” as a terrorist will also be explored.  Policies and procedures used by countries around the world to prevent and respond to terrorism will be examined.  The relative success of these policies and procedures will be evaluated and their potential for implementation in the United States.   The course will take up the focus on terrorism in the United States and the consequences this has had on emergency management and the all-hazard approach.

EM 343 INCIDENT MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon

This course examines the National Incident Management System (NIMS).  It explores the five major components of NIMS, preparedness, communications and information management, resource management, command and management and finally ongoing management and maintenance.  In particular the course will address command and management and the Incident Command System (ICS).  This course will explore both scene management and the interface with multi-agency coordinating groups.  The course also addresses management of the multi-agency coordinating groups.  The course will explore the difference between disaster management and daily incident management.

EM 363 PUBLIC INFORMATION AND MEDIA 3 CR web icon

This course explores the role of public information in emergency management.  The course will address communication with the general public, chief elected officials and senior management, responders, other stakeholders and the media.  The course will look at the roles and responsibilities of the various stakeholders in communicating with the various audiences.  The role of media in communicating vital information during a disaster will be addressed as well as their impact on response and recovery efforts and public opinion.  The role of social media will also be addressed.

EM 383 PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE OPERATIONS 3 CR web icon
The purpose of this course is to promote effective disaster response and management. The course will examine the nature of disasters and the roles of various agencies and actors in response to them. The course will also explore various preparedness strategies that enable more effective disaster response. Past responses will be examined as well as problem solving to propose solutions and improvements that could positively impact future responses. Each student will be expected to gain a solid comprehension of common post-disaster problems as well as effective means of overcoming those challenges and problems.

EM 403 MANAGING CONSEQUENCES OF TERRORISM 3 CR web icon
The history of violence and terrorism, domestic, internationally, and trans-nationally will be reviewed in this course. Hazard analysis, risk assessment and mitigation strategies will be covered. The structure and legal context of anti-terrorism programs, responding to terrorist disasters, and preparedness are all major parts of the course.

EM 423 SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF DISASTER 3 CR web icon
This course will be an overview of empirical versus theoretical approaches; human behavior in disaster; myths and reality; group disaster behavior; community social systems and disaster; cultures, demographics, and disaster behavior distinctions; and model-building in sociological disaster research.

EM 453 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This course is an overview of the emergency management core courses and will pull the theories, concepts and practices of EM together. Students in this course will work collaboratively to solve simulated disasters in a way that produces the most desirable outcomes to all citizens affected by the simulated disasters. Recovery operations will be stressed.

EM 503 ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course prepares the emergency manager to assess, mitigate and manage emergencies that impact our communities in accordance with national standards. Emphasis is place on the roles of government agencies - local, state, and federal - and the facilitation of strategic plans that address unique community situations. A global perspective for emergency management activities is stressed.

EM 513 SEMINAR IN HAZARD MITIGATION 3 CR web icon
The focus of this course will be to equip emergency managers to address principles of community resilience for both natural and man-made disasters, to implement formal risk assessments, and to involve private sector entities in mitigation strategies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the development and facilitation of a formalized planning process in the successful mitigation of potential hazards.

EM 623 COMPREHENSIVE RISK ASSESSMENT AND VULNERABILITY 3 CR web icon
This is a project-based course that integrates hazard, risk, and vulnerability analyses within a comprehensive disaster management strategy. A focus will be on assisting local communities to assess their unique vulnerabilities and develop policies and processes that mitigate those hazards. Special attention will be placed on maintaining business contingency plans and continuity of operations.

EM 653 MANAGING DISASTER RELIEF AND RECOVERY OPERATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course is designed to develop competency in damage assessment, disaster declaration, and debris management for both natural and man-made disasters. The focus will be on supervising programs and personnel in accordance with national standards, policies, and procedures, as well as on providing leadership for recovery solutions and future disaster mitigation.

EM 693 EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DEMONSTRATION PROJECT 3 CR web icon
An in-depth analysis of the concepts contained within the concentration courses. Conducted under the direction of a criminal justice faculty member and a professional emergency management specialist, the student will design and implement a capstone project, and then present the results to a committee of at least two full-time or adjunct professors, one of which has professional emergency management or first responder experience.

ENG 103 ENGLISH COMPOSITION I 3 CR web icon
Intensive training in methods of exposition leading to the ability to write coherent, clear, and persuasive essays.

ENG 113 ENGLISH COMPOSITION II 3 CR web icon
Continuation of ENG 103. Concentration on research paper and library methods. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 104

ENG 133 TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION 3 CR web icon
Emphasizes clear writing and oral communication in professional situations for technical fields. Concentration on project-oriented instruction, which includes creating technical documents (email, reports, proposals, instructions, et.al.) and adapting them to specific audiences and tasks. Prerequisite: ENG 103 or ENG 104

ENG 153 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 3 CR web icon
Introduces the student to literature of some complexity and sophistication, developing a critical vocabulary and skills in reading on an advanced level. Analysis of genre: short fiction, poetry, and drama.

ENG 204 BRITISH LITERATURE 4 CR web icon
A survey of British literature to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 212 MYTHOLOGY 2 CR web icon
An introduction to world mythology, with emphasis on Greek and Roman legends. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 214 AMERICAN LITERATURE 4 CR web icon
A survey of American literature to the present. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 253 READINGS IN WORLD LITERATURE 3 CR web icon
Readings in selected major works which have influenced thought and culture. Selections may be drawn from (but not limited to) such writers as Dante, Juvenal, Confucius, Montaigne, Rabelais, Cervantes, Moliere, Goethe, and Dostoyevsky. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 263 CONTEMPORARY THEMES IN LITERATURE 3 CR
A critical study of works of literature selected for their relevancy to current social, ethnic, minority, and ethical problems. Special emphasis placed upon minority writers. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 323 RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE 3 CR web icon
A study of literature from 1660-1798. Authors studied include Moliere and Restoration playwrights, Swift, Pope, Voltaire, Dr. Johnson, and others. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 333 STUDIES IN LITERATURE 3 CR web icon
Study of selected authors and topics. May be repeated for credit so long as course content is not substantially duplicated. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 363 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE 3 CR
A systematic study of the development of the English language from its medieval beginnings; some consideration of contemporary dialectic and semantic differences; work with etymology. Prerequisite: ENG 113

ENG 403 BRITISH AND AMERICAN NOVELS I 3 CR
A chronological study of the major thematic and structural developments in the novel from its beginnings to the 21st century. Social commentary and satire on classes, monarchy, empire, war, education, religion, marriage, middle class morality. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 423 DRAMA 3 CR web icon
Studies of selected playwrights, movements, trends, and developments in world drama from the beginnings to the present day. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 433 SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES 3 CR web icon
The close reading of at least eight plays by Shakespeare. Discussion of his life and times, the sonnets, his themes, and the differences between texts and productions. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 443 POETRY 3 CR
An investigation of the poetic process through the careful examination of selected poems and statements about poetry. Prerequisite: ENG 153

ENG 463 CREATIVE WRITING 3 CR
Directed experiments in the original composition of literary essays, plays, short stories, longer narratives, or poems. Prerequisites: ENG 113, ENG 153

ENG 400X DIRECTED STUDIES IN ENGLISH VARIES (1-3 HRS.)
For senior students of superior ability able to assume a larger share of the responsibility for designing and pursuing a reading research project which is academically respectable. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

ENG 401X CAPSTONE STUDY IN ENGLISH 4-0-4
A capstone course for students who plan to enter law or graduate school and who are capable of writing a polished, academically significant research paper in the field of English. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

ENT 303 ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADERSHIP 3 CR
This course examines leadership, influence, and power as it relates to entrepreneurship with a strong emphasis on entrepreneurial character traits and business ethics. Historical, literary, and contemporary examples of successful entrepreneurs provide a framework for examining the theories of leadership and power.

ENT 313 BUSINESS CONCEPTS (FOR NON-BUSINESS MAJORS) 3 CR
A survey course designed to introduce non-business majors to business issues and practices. All major functions of business are included (management, marketing, law, finance, economics, operations, accounting, information technology) as well as issues facing the business person (ethics, globalization, motivation, etc.). Not open to students enrolled in the business programs.

ENT 323 ENGINEERING CONCEPTS (FOR NON-ENGINEERING MAJORS) 3 CR
Fundamental engineering concepts are introduced, with an emphasis on developing foundations for lifelong learning of technological issues. Broad-based technologies and the importance of technical communication are emphasized. Current and future technologies are discussed by visiting practitioners. Not open to students enrolled in the engineering and technology programs.

ENT 333 ENTREPRENEURSHIP SEMINAR SERIES 3 CR
Through case studies, simulations, guest lectures, and reading, students become aware of legal business structures, legal issues related to emerging ventures (patents, copyrights, trademarks, licensing, franchising, employment law, etc.), venture financing, and venture marketing. Prerequisite: ENT 313 or 323

ENT 413 CREATIVITY?PRODUCT/SERVICE DEVELOP. 3 CR
This course explores the nature of creativity from four interacting viewpoints: person, process, product, and environment. Its goal is to develop students' awareness of their creative potential. Activities include group work, discussion, and the development of an idea or invention. Prerequisite: BA 123 or ENT 313

ENT 423 ENTREPRENEURSHIP & VENTURE PLANNING 3 CR
This course focuses on entrepreneurship and small business management. Through case studies, simulations, guest lectures, reading and business plan development, students become aware of the unique challenges facing small business owners and entrepreneurs. Students become familiar with the resources available to small business owners by developing and presenting a business start-up plan. Prerequisite: ENT 413

ENT 463 INTERNSHIP (3 HRS.)
Students will be assigned to a real world new venture, small business, or corporate new product development department to gain experience in the art and science of entrepreneurial/intrapreneurial thinking, problem solving, and decision making. The term of the internship will vary depending on the nature of the position and responsibilities. Ideally, students will be assigned the internship during the summer between their junior and senior year. Prerequisite: Junior Standing

ETD 103 BASIC TECHNICAL DRAWING 2-2-3
A course in the fundamentals of drafting. Use of instruments and materials, lettering and techniques of penciling. Primary emphasis is on shape and size description of three-dimensional objects. Preparation of drawings for various reproduction processes. Application of drawing geometry and study of sections and conventional practices.

ETD 113 GEOMETRIC DIMENSIONING AND TOLERANCING 3 CR
Introduction to geometric dimensioning and tolerancing including advanced applications of dimensioning principles, tolerances and precision dimensioning. Introduction to part measurement techniques as it relates to geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Prerequisite: ETD 103

ETD 123 MANUFACTURING MATERIALS AND PROCESSES 3 CR
Physical properties of ferrous and nonferrous materials, such as wood products, plastics, and rubber. Heat treating and testing of metals. Industrial practice in the working of metals and plastics. Fundamentals of metallurgy, machining, casting, welding and forming.

ETD 143 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY 3 CR
Introduction to the principles of multiview drawings and the solutions of space problems. Methods for solution of point, line and plane problems, and the angle between planes, parallelism and perpendicularity, revolution, intersection and development problems. Prerequisite: ETD 103

ETD 163 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 3 CR
This introductory level course investigates safety philosophy and the principles of safety. The student will study occupational safety and industrial hazard control with a focus on the basic principles of accident prevention. The analysis of safety performance, cost and identification of accident potential is also studies. Emphasis is placed on concepts and techniques proven useful in reducing accidents and injuries.

ETD 173 COMPUTER AIDED 3-D MODELING 1-4-3
An introductory course which studies the concept of parametric modeling and its application in industry. In this course students will learn the fundamentals of 3D parametric modeling, detail drawing creation, and assembly modeling using industry standard parametric modeling software. Prerequisite: ETD 103 or EGR 143

ETD 203 BASIC MECHANISMS 3 CR
Introduction to simple mechanisms and their kinematics. Study of linkages, cams, gearing, and belts.
Prerequisites: PH 154, MA 123

ETD 233 ENGINEERING & MANUFACUTURING SYSTEMS 3 CR
A study of engineering and manufacturing systems such as engineering documentation systems, design control and lean manufacturing technologies. Prerequisites: ETD 173

ETD 243 STATICS AND STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 3 CR
Principles of statics, analysis of structures, graphic methods, and friction as applied to the inclined plane and wedge. Simple direct and combined stresses, determination of structural sizes as function of unit stress, and physical properties of the materials. Prerequisites: MA 123

ETD 253 DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY 3 CR
Emphasis on methods and principles of measuring basic physical qualities for inspection and quality control. Laboratory work in measuring physical variables such as size, flatness, circularity, and total run-out. An introduction and project work in related areas, such as reverse engineering, functional gauge design, and statistical process control. Prerequisites: ETD 113, ETD 123, ETD 173

ETD 263 DESIGN, ANALYSIS, AND PROTOTYPING 2-4-3
The use of the CAD system as an engineering tool for the presentation of engineering problem solving. The set-up and maintenance of CAD systems. A study of the advanced techniques that are available on typical CAD systems and their applications in industrial systems. Prerequisite: ETD 233

ETD 273 ELECTRICAL FUNDAMENTALS 3 CR
Electrical circuit principles. Basic circuit laws, motors, generators, controls, distribution systems, and electrical codes are presented. Theory of electricity and magnetism, electrical phenomena, and measurements. Circuits, power, AC phenomena, capacitance, and conduction are studied. Prerequisites: MA 113, PH 154

ETD 293 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL PRINCIPLES 3 CR
History of numerical control and comparison with conventional machining systems. Standard coding system and control terminology. Prerequisites: ETD 123, ETD 173

ETD 323 PRODUCT DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT 3-2-3
Introduction to product analysis, development and design. Conceptual design, design for manufacture, reverse engineering, concurrent engineering, designing for special needs, prototyping, and product safety. Integration of previous work into complete product design project. Prerequisites: PH 173, ETD 233

ETD 363 ELEMENTS OF MACHINES 3 CR
Design principles and calculations of machine elements. Consideration of economy, loads, stresses, deformations, and environment. Prerequisite: ETD 243, PH 154

ETD 423 SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT 4-0-3
Study of advanced design methods as used in engineering design. A study of the design process as practiced in the industrial setting. The procedures used from the start of a design until its final production including presentations and design reports. Prerequisites: ETD 263, ETD 323, ETD 363

ETD 433 COMPUTER NUMERICAL CONTROL PRINCIPLES 2-2-3
History of numerical control and comparison with conventional machining systems. Standard coding system and control terminology. Prerequisites: ETD 123, ETD 263

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FIN 303 MANAGERIAL FINANCE 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of the principles of managerial finance including time value of money, capital budgeting, methods of financing, working capital management, financial statement analysis, and other financial topics. Prerequisites: AC 213, ECO 213, ECO 223, MA 253, or permission of the instructor

FIN 313 CORPORATE FINANCE 3 CR
An analytical approach to financial management of a corporation. Areas covered include: long term financing, financial structure, cost of capital, dividend policy, mergers, reorganization, and international financial management. Prerequisite: FIN 303

FIN 323 MONEY AND BANKING 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of the principles of monetary economics. An analysis of the structure and operation of financial institutions and the Federal Reserve System is included. The function of monetary policy within the framework of macroeconomic theory is examined. Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as ECO 323)

FIN 333 PUBLIC FINANCE 3 CR
This course involves an investigation of the role of the public sector in economic development. Fiscal policy and the practice of public finance are examined. Topics cover cost functions for public goods, externalities, and fiscal federalism. Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as ECO 333)

FIN 343 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 3 CR
This course involves a study of the topics essential to the understanding of international finance. Topics include foreign exchange markets and currency risk, international financial markets, international banking, trade financing, country risk analysis, accounting and taxation issues, capital budgeting, and international lending, and borrowing techniques. Prerequisite: FIN 303

FIN 353 PERSONAL FINANCE 3 CR web icon
An overview of financing decisions made by individual investors for personal financial needs. The course will cover pension investing, tax considerations, retirement planning, and various investment products available to investors. Prerequisite: MA 103

FIN 363 VENTURE FINANCING 3 CR
This course examines the venture financing options available for new business startups; emphasizes creating and analyzing financial documents, approaching financial sources, assessing the financing alternatives, selling stock for growing companies, the capital structure decision and managing the financial condition of a new venture. Prerequisite: FIN 303

FIN 403 INVESTMENTS 3 CR web icon
An overview of the security markets, sources of investment information, and the classic process of analyzing and valuing securities is presented. Investment opportunities in a wide variety of financial and real assets are explored. The concept of portfolio theory in terms of risk and return is examined. Prerequisite: FIN 303

FIN 473 FINANCE TECHNOLOGIES 3 CR
This course is a study of the principles of managerial finance, investments, and other topics relevant to the field of finance. Students explore how to use technologies, such as Excel, WINKS, and others to solve financial problems. Prerequisites: INF 113, FIN 303

FIN 493 TOPICS IN FINANCE 3 CR
Offered to examine specific or current business or special financial issues. Possible examples could include asset management, corporate financing, securities analysis and management of financial institutions. Prerequisite: FIN 303

FIN 503 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS FOR DECISION MAKING 3 CR
This course reviews the economic and organizational context in which resource allocation decisions are made. Primary tools to be used include spreadsheet analysis, financial simulation, and case studies. Topics to be included are: the capital expenditure decision process, reviewing capital investment projects, capital expenditures, EVA, lease-versus-buy decisions and cash flow analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or approval of instructor

FLM 202 FILM APPRECIATION 2 CR
Acquaints the student with the art of film criticism. Presents basic cinema vocabulary, information about film production, theory and history of film, and practice in analysis of individual films.

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GE 101 INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING 1 CR
This course is required for all freshman engineering students. Its purpose is to improve student success, to make the college experience more relevant to career goals, and to help students obtain as much assistance from the University as possible while working towards their engineering degrees. The course will cover community building, academic goals, effective learning methods, University orientation, and personal and professional development.

GE 401 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 1 CR
This course covers the two broad areas of professional practice. The first consists of topics pertinent to career aspects of the profession: job search activities, graduate school information, lifelong learning, professional registration, and the role of professional societies. The second area concerns the social responsibilities of the practicing professional engineer: professional ethics, the role of engineering in public policy, the need for knowledge of current affairs, and consideration of the impact of technology upon society. Prerequisite: Senior standing in engineering

GEO 203 OCEANOGRAPHY 3 CR
A description of the oceans and their relation to humans. The principles of physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanography are used to explain the ocean environment. Society's effect on the oceans and problems and potentials of utilizing the natural resources of the sea. Prerequisites: A laboratory science and MA 113 (Same as EAS 203 and BIO 203)

GEO 213 PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 CR web icon
An analysis of the spatial and functional relationships among landforms, climates, soils, water, and the living world. This course also addresses the connections between environmental processes and human activity, such as human impact on the environment. (Same as EAS 213)

GEO 303 HUMAN GEOGRAPHY 3 CR
Topical studies to show how human beings have altered and adapted to their physical environments over time through technology, migration, and demographic changes. Focus is on cultural identity and landscape, cultural interaction, and conflict.

GEO 313 GEOGRAPHY OF NORTH AMERICA 3 CR
A regional approach to the United States and Canada. An in-depth look at economic, political, historical, and cultural developments in the content of the physical environment. Focus on the present and the future of each region, as well as how those futures are intertwined. Global context is also considered.

GEO 323 WORLD GEOGRAPHY 3 CR
A study of the major cultural regions of the world, with emphasis on human social development (economic, cultural, historical, political), in the context of a given physical environment. Focus is on the present and future of each region, as well as how those futures are intertwined. Prerequisite: GEO 303

GEO 343 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 3 CR
A spatial approach to economics, the course considers historical, present and future economic activities, developments, and trends, in a global context, with the goal of answering the two basic questions of geography: "where?" and "why there?". Prerequisite: ECO 223 (Same as ECO 343)

GEO 353 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 CR
The politics of place. A review of the basic concepts and principles of geopolitics, designed to help students understand the connections between place and political decision-making. The course explores the applications of these concepts using past and present world events, as well as projecting possible futures. Prerequisite: GOV 113 (Same as GOV 353)

GEO 400X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN GEOGRAPHY VARIES(1-4 HRS.)
Credit earned through directed reading, independent study, research or supervised field work. Maximum four hours credit. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

GLY 271 GEOLOGY LABORATORY 0-1-1
An introductory laboratory study of basic physical geology. The laboratory emphasizes skills needed for the identification of minerals and rocks, for the interpretation of land surface features based on topographic maps and for the understanding of folding, faulting, and rock relationships through the interpretation of geologic maps. Co requisite or Prerequisite: GLY 273

GLY 273 GEOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the field of geology. Study of minerals and rocks and their formation within the context of the earth's geologic history. Emphasis on soils, running water, and groundwater. Plate tectonics, glaciers, volcanoes, erosion, and weathering are also covered. (Same as EAS 273)

GOV 113 INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT 3 CR web icon
An examination of the origins and operations of the national political machinery; the development, functions and philosophy of political parties; the problems and tasks of leading governmental agencies.

GOV 313 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS 3 CR
A comparison of the systems, philosophies and functions of the governments of England, France, the United States, Germany and the countries of the former Soviet Union. Prerequisite: GOV 113

GOV 323 THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 3 CR
An analysis of current global issues from a historical perspective with an emphasis on developing an awareness of cultural diversity and an understanding of the role of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Prerequisites: GOV 113 or HIS 113 (Same as HIS 323)

GOV 333 STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 3 CR web icon
The general relationship between the states and the federal government; organization, functions, and divisions of authority between the executive, legislative and judicial. The functions, powers, and forms of county and municipal governments. Prerequisite: GOV 113

GOV 343 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 3 CR web icon
A survey and analysis of significant political ideas from colonial times to present. Some of the ideas discussed in the survey include the philosophies of liberalism, conservatism, and pragmatism, as well as the political thinking of such men as Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John C. Calhoun, Henry Thoreau, Herbert Spencer and Lester Ward. Prerequisite: GOV 113 (Same as HIS 343)

GOV 353 POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY 3 CR
The politics of place. A review of the basic concepts and principles of geopolitics, designed to help students understand the connections between place and political decision-making. The course explores the applications of these concepts using past and present world events, as well as projecting possible futures. Prerequisite: GOV 113 (Same as GEO 353)

GOV 363 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY 3 CR
A history of United States involvement in world affairs from the War for Independence to the present; the close relationship between the foreign policy and domestic concerns is emphasized; an analysis of the policy-making bureaucracy. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113, or GOV 113 (Same as HIS 363)

GOV 373 POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An examination of the role of group dynamics and personality variables in contemporary political issues, including leadership and power, political attitudes, current social movements, conflict resolution, coalition formation, cross-cultural comparison of political attitudes and other issues. Prerequisites: PSY 113 or GOV 113 (Same as PSY 373)

GOV 403 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 3 CR web icon
A study of the historical and judicial developments of the Constitution of the United States by analyzing court decisions and the philosophies of the justices of the Supreme Court. Emphasis on the court's role in the development of national economic policy, with a focus on the court's position on civil rights and liberties, political freedom and social equality. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113, GOV 113 (Same as HIS 403)

GOV 400X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN GOVERNMENT VARIES (1-4 HRS.)
Credit earned through directed reading, independent study, research or supervised field work. Maximum 4 hours credit. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

GS 4003 SENIOR CAPSTONE PROJECT 3 CR
The capstone project will give students the opportunity to demonstrate the integration of the two to three academic programs they have chosen for the self-directed concentration. The project will include an oral and written presentation encapsulating the rationale for the programs selected and the nature of the relationship between them.

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H

HC 303 HISTORY OF AMERICAN HEALTHCARE 3 CR
This course is an introductory course in healthcare management. The course will present the history of healthcare systems in America from the late 1800's through the present day. Emphasis will be placed on an understanding of key historical forces which have shaped new millennium models of the American healthcare delivery system.

HC 333 MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES & PRINCIPLES 3 CR web icon
This course will offer a variety of industrial management techniques applicable to department-level projects within a healthcare facility. The course will incorporate projects and statistical analysis of current operations. Hospital ancillary support departments as well as direct patient care departments will be reviewed. Recommendations for improvement will be derived from the analysis of workflow data and other internal information sources. The course addresses the overall management of a healthcare facility and explores issues such as how to determine what is broken in the organization, prioritization of changes or improvements, long-term impact of current problems, and response strategies to internal and external forces. Prerequisite: MA 253

HC 403 PROGRAM AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
In this course, the student will study and analyze future program options related to healthcare facilities. Management of healthcare facilities will be studied. Analysis of current programs and facilities and the potential need for programs and/or facilities expansion will be covered. Strategic long-range and tactical short-range planning will be an integral part of this course and will cover both program and facilities planning topics. Prerequisite: MA 253

HC 413 HEALTH CARE ACCOUNTING 3 CR web icon
This course introduces the student to accounting specifically related to the health care industry. Audit procedures, insurance (including Medicare and Medicaid) reimbursement, fund accounting, government and grant accounting are also covered. This course uses computer applications. Prerequisite: AC 213

HC 423 HEALTH CARE FINANCE 3 CR web icon
An analytical approach to financial management of a corporation. Areas covered include: Operating and capital budgets, capital purchases, cost benefit analysis and break-even analysis, financial statement analysis and the financing of facilities. The course is considered the second course and continuation of Managerial Finance with a specialization in health care issues. Prerequisite: FIN 303, HC 413

HC 443 HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
This course will evaluate and describe various financing mechanisms available within the healthcare industry. Issues related to insurance and managed care will be explored. The ongoing problem of healthcare availability and accessibility in the United States will be reviewed. The impact of economics, national health status statistics and public policy legislation affecting the U.S. healthcare system will be discussed. A research paper related to the current status of the healthcare delivery system of a foreign country will be required.

HC 453 HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This course will be a culmination of the Healthcare Management core. A comprehensive research project dealing with a healthcare related case study will be undertaken and presented by the student. The project will include written and oral presentations of the research findings. Prerequisite: All other courses in the HCM core should be taken prior to this course.

HC 483 PROGRAM AND FACILITIES MANAGEMENT
This course is the culmination of the Health Care Management core and serves as the capstone course. In this course, the student will study and analyze future program options related to healthcare facilities. Management of health care facilities will be studied. Analysis of current programs and facilities and the potential need for programs and/or facilities expansion will be covered. Strategic long-range and tactical short-range planning will be an integral part of this course and will cover both program and facilities planning topics. A comprehensive research project dealing with a health care related case study will be undertaken and presented by the student. The project will include written and oral presentations of the research findings. Prerequisites: All other courses in the Health Care Management core should be taken prior to this course.

HIS 103 AMERICAN HISTORY I 3 CR web icon
Traces the major trends in the history of the United States from colonial times to the end of Reconstruction. Concentrates upon the diplomatic, political, economic, intellectual, and cultural achievements of the American nation, set within the larger framework of the European world.

HIS 113 AMERICAN HISTORY II 3 CR web icon
Increasing emphasis on the post Civil War industrial development of the United States and its subsequent role as a great world power to present.

HIS 203 WORLD CIVILIZATION I 3 CR web icon
A historical review of human civilization from prehistoric times through the Renaissance. The class focuses upon the political, economic, and cultural achievements of various civilizations of the world.

HIS 213 WORLD CIVILIZATION II 3 CR web icon
A survey of major civilizations of the world in the post-Renaissance period, including Asian, African, and Western European civilizations in the areas of politics, economics, and scientific, and cultural developments. Emphasis is placed on the increasing interdependence of world civilizations and people.

HIS 251 ANCIENT GREECE FROM THE PERSIAN THROUGH PELOPONNESIAN WARS 1 CR
An examination of the culture of Athens and Sparta during the 5th century B.C., concentrating on the Persian and Peloponnesian wars and their lasting effects on Western Civilization. (Same as PHL 251)

HIS 253 THE JAPANESE PEOPLE 3 CR
A humanistic approach to the study of the Japanese people. An emphasis on using a historical context to reveal domestic political, social, and economic associations, as well as important achievements in literature, religion, philosophy and art.

HIS 323 THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD 3 CR web icon
An analysis of current global issues from a historical perspective with an emphasis on developing an awareness of cultural diversity and an understanding of the role of international governmental and nongovernmental organizations. Prerequisite: GOV 113 or HIS 113 (Same as GOV 323)

HIS 343 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 3 CR web icon
A survey and analysis of significant political ideas from colonial times to the present. Some of the ideas discussed in the survey include the philosophies of liberalism, conservatism, and pragmatism, as well as the political thinking of such men as Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, John C. Calhoun, Henry Thoreau, Herbert Spencer, and Lester Ward. Prerequisite: GOV 113 (Same as GOV 343)

HIS 363 UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY 3 CR
A history of the United States involvement in world affairs from the War of Independence to the present, the close relationship between the foreign policy and domestic concerns is emphasized; an analysis of the policymaking bureaucracy. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113, or GOV 113 (Same as GOV 363)

HIS 393 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 3 CR web icon
A survey of major economic developments in American history. Stresses the changed conditions and values in moving from an agricultural to an industrial society. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113 (Same as ECO 393)

HIS 403 AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 3 CR
A study of the historical and judicial developments of the Constitution of the United States by analyzing court decisions and the philosophies of the justices of the Supreme Court. Emphasis on the court's role in the development of national economic policy, with a focus on the court's position on civil rights and liberties, political freedom, and social equality. Prerequisites: HIS 103, HIS 113, GOV 113 (Same as GOV 403)

HIS 423 THE UNITED STATES AS A WORLD POWER 3 CR
A study of social, economic, intellectual, and political developments within the United States from approximately 1939 to the present. Emphasis is placed on relating America's developments to its role in international affairs. Prerequisite: HIS 113

HIS 433 THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 3 CR
A history of the War of Independence and the formation of national government to 1787. Prerequisite: HIS 103

HIS 443 READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY 3 CR
An independent study and research on selected topics in American History. Open to students with departmental approval.

HIS 453 READINGS IN WORLD HISTORY 3 CR
An independent study and research on selected topics in World History. Open to students with departmental approval.

HIS 400X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN HISTORY VARIES (1-4 HRS.)
Credit earned through directed reading, independent study, research, or supervised field work. Maximum 4 hours credit. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chair

HOS 103 CURRENT TRENDS IN TOURISM 3 CR web icon
The objective of this class is to look at the research, stats, and current trends as they relate to the Tourism Industry. Upon examination of the research, the class will discuss how the industry continues to adapt to meet the ever changing demands of the public.

HOS 203 LODGING MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
The objectives of this class are to examine the policies, techniques and trends in hotel administration from a front office perspective. Topics such as organization, ethics, procedures, and communication amongst the hotel staff and with the hotel guest will be examined.

HOS 213 SOPHOMORE INTERNSHIP IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 3 HRS
This sophomore experience is the first of two internships required for a Hospitality Management major. This field related experience is under the direction of a field supervisor and University supervisor. The Internship must have the approval of the Department Chair.

HOS 303 HOSPITALITY AND TOURISM MARKETING 3 CR web icon
The objective of this class is to provide the student with an understanding of the techniques used to market the many facets of the hospitality and tourism industry. Packaging pricing, promoting, advertising and merchandising will all be explored as they relate to restaurant sales, hotel occupancy, and the travel and tourism industry.

HOS 313 CATERING 3 CR
The objective of this class is look at catering from a business perspective including pricing, production, promoting, packaging, and customer service.

HOS 322 MEETING AND EVENT PLANNING 2 CR web icon
This class looks at meeting and event planning from an organizational and administration perspective. Customer service as it relates to meeting the needs of the client will be examined. The culminating projects of this class are the creation of a event planning resource notebook and the class project of putting on a "campus event."

HOS 402 BEVERAGE MANAGEMENT 2 CR
The objective of this class is to give the student an education in the purchasing, storing, serving, and production of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. Prerequisites: a hospitality management major and 21 years of age

HOS 404 QUALITY FOOD PREPARATION 4 CR
The class will examine food preparation methods and service techniques important to the success of a food service operation. Menu planning, food preparation and production along with proper food service methods will be studied. A basic knowledge of food service operations will be taught in a lab setting through the production of a "A Night out on the Town." Student will exhibit their skills by performing a variety of tasks in a cooperative environment as they produce a dining experience to the general public.

HOS 413 CASINO, SPA AND RESORT MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This class examines the day to day operations of casinos, spas, and resorts from a front office perspective including the law, procedures, and organizational structure. This class incorporates both classroom and field experiences to give the student the necessary perspective of how these facilities become successful.

HOS 423 SANITATION AND HEALTH IN THE FOOD SERVICE, LODGING, AND TOURISM INDUSTRY 3 CR
This class will discuss food safety and other health related issues common to the Hospitality Industry, and other institutional programs like hospitals, schools, restaurants, cruise ships, airlines, and other form of travel. Students must pass a National Sanitation Certification examination upon completion of the course.

HOS 473 SENIOR INTERNSHIP IN HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This internship experience is of great importance to the Hospitality Management major because it comes at a time where the student has through their classroom experiences at Trine University, gained a knowledge of the hospitality and tourism industry, and now goes out into the field to compliment their knowledge of the subject. The internship must have approval of the Department Chair.

HPE 131 FIRST AID 1 CR
Classroom discussion and practical application of basic first aid principles. American Red Cross certification available.

HPE 253 RISK MANAGEMENT 3 CR
Consideration of the legal aspects involved with physical education and sport activities. Emphasis on negligence case law, liability issues and facility safety.

HPE 273 NUTRITION 3 CR
A review of the nature of nutritional needs. Focus will include the function of nutrients in the body, weight control and the importance of balanced diets.

HPE 313 PRINCIPLES OF SPORT AND RECREATION 3 CR
A study of the management, marketing, financial and legal principles within a sports and recreation operation and the primary components and support structures of the industry. The purpose is to examines and gain and understanding of all facets of running a team or sporting organization. A significant research project will be due at the end of the course.

HR 303 COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS 3 CR web icon
This course examines the role of compensation and benefits in today's workplace. It emphasizes the role, importance, and impact of a defined compensation and benefits strategy. Emphasis will be on assessment of compensation and benefit plans. Topics include traditional and non-traditional bases of pay, strategies for developing benefits plans, administering compensation, and benefit plans. Prerequisite: FIN 303

HR 313 TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT 3 CR web icon
Provides a review of the field of training and development, including topics such as adult learning theory, training needs assessment, the design, delivery and evaluation of training and development programs, career development, and e-learning. Prerequisite: MGT 313

HR 323 SAFETY AND HEALTH MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course examines the role of occupational safety and health in the workplace today. It emphasizes the need for and the impact of having a strong safety and health program. Topics include identification and assessment of major types of occupational hazards including falls, mechanical, environmental, electrical, fire, weather, and stress. OSHA regulations, fines and authority, safety standards, accident prevention and investigation, safety and analysis, and safety and health management concepts are also covered. Prerequisite: MGT 313

HR 403 PROJECT MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
A study of effective project planning and management. Topics covered include project goals, objectives, and feasibility. Estimation of completion times and costs, evaluation and review, incentives, and quantitative analysis are also topics. Case studies and project management software used extensively.

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INF 103 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS 3 CR web icon
Terminology, concepts, principles, and use of computer in solutions of business, scientific and educational decision-making problems. Introduction to system structures, storage media, peripheral equipment, communications and Web development. Emphasis on topics in human-computer interaction and human factors, collaborative technologies, ethics, privacy, and ownership of information and information sources, information representation and the information life cycle, the transformation of data to information. Hands on assignments: Word Processing, Spreadsheet Analysis, Database, Presentation Graphics, and collaboration software. Prerequisite: Computer Literacy

INF 113 BUSINESS COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course emphasizes predominant software packages in word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, database management, and e-mail usage, with an eventual goal of the student gaining certification in those areas.

INF 223 ADVANCED SPREADSHEET FOR BUSINESS 3 CR
Concepts including raw data management, business analysis and reporting. Other concepts include: collaboration and workbook security, using tables to analyze and report data, integrating and manipulating data from external sources, creating and auditing complex formulas, automation features, advanced data analysis, using charts to analyze and communicate business information Prerequisite: INF 103 or INF 113

INF 263 DATABASE CONCEPTS AND APPLICATIONS 3 CR
Concepts including entity-relationship diagrams, normalization to fifth normal form, database optimization. Other concepts include: file organization, database representation, descriptions, software reliability, security, integrity, relational data bases, query languages. Prerequisite: INF 103

INF 273 VIDEO I 3 CR
A study of time-based media production, design and issues including in-class demonstrations of equipment, camera/lighting techniques, file formats, codes, emphasizing attributes of digital video editing software. Exercises illustrate principles of visual dynamic images over a time frame. Students produce experimental commercial works of 10 to 15 seconds duration to interviews, documentaries, narratives up to 5 minutes length. Issues regarding streamed video discussed. Prerequisite: INF 223

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L

LAW 203 BUSINESS LAW I 3 CR web icon
This course is an introduction to the American legal system. It includes a survey of courts, legal procedures, torts, and criminal law. It involves an intensive study of the common law of contracts, including contract formation, performance, breach and remedies, as well as a study of the law of sales under the Uniform Commercial Code.

LAW 303 BUSINESS LAW II 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of the law of agency, partnerships, corporations, and other business organizations. It includes a study of negotiable instruments, secured transactions, surety ship, bankruptcy, securities regulation, and related legal issues. Prerequisite: LAW 203

LAW 313 AUCTION LAW 3 CR

An overview of laws impacting the auctioneering environment. Ethical standards and legal ramifications of actions within the auctioneering profession will be explored and discussed. Prerequisite:  LAW 203

LAW 323 BANKRUPTCY 3 CR

An in-depth study of  federal bankruptcy regulations as well as state and local regulations.  The impact of bankruptcy on the auctioneering industry will be examined.  Prerequisite:  LAW 203

LAW 403 EMPLOYMENT LAW 3 CR web icon
This course is a survey of the law relating to the employment relationship, with a major emphasis on federal law. The course covers unions and collective bargaining under the National Labor Relations Act. Discrimination in employment will address the Civil Rights Act of 1964 as amended, the Equal Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and related statutes. State and federal law with regard to employment-at-will, privacy, whistleblower protection, and related issues will also be discussed. Prerequisites: LAW 203, MGT 363

LAW 413 INTERNATIONAL LAW 3 CR
The legal considerations governing international business transactions. Introduction to the international legal environment including the status of international law, international dispute settlement, conflicts of law. A more detailed study of the international contracting process, international payment mechanisms, carriage contracts, insurance issues, and related subjects. Government regulation of international business will also be addressed. Prerequisites: LAW 203, BA 343

LAW 503 PUBLIC POLICY AND THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT 3 CR
This course includes an analysis of the legal, political and economic framework that has shaped public policy toward business in the United States. It will include the methods as to how public policy is created and its implications for management decision-making. The issues that this course will be concerned with are: how public policy is related to societal, community, employee, consumer, and environmental concerns and their implication for business. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or approval of instructor

LDR 5003 LEADERSHIP PHILOSOPHY 3 CR web icon
An exploration of the nature of business leadership models and theories, examining these models through a broad variety of insights and viewpoints. Provides a description and analysis of these approaches to leadership, giving special attention to how the models can improve leadership in the real-world organization.

LDR 5023 STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
A study of the formulation of strategy and policy in the organization, emphasizing the integration of strategic decisions across the functional areas and across multiple business units. Significant emphasis is placed on the critical role that leaders play in driving organizational success while concurrently ensuring ethical soundness.

LDR 5043 ORGANIZATIONAL SYSTEMS AND CULTURES 3 CR web icon
This course will equip students to fully understand the complexities of organizational systems and cultures, the ways in which these forces manifest themselves, and the means by which leaders intentionally impact the shape that these forces take in their organizations. Students will explore the application of various organizational systems and cultures theories to case studies, as well as to their current professional settings. Additionally, students will research and critically analyze the comparative cultures of two organizations from the same industry. The findings related to this research will be presented in the form of an Executive Presentation and related written analysis report. Prerequisites:  LDR 5003, LDR 5023

LDR 5063 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE 3 CR web icon

An exploration of the behavioral forces and relationships that influence organizational effectiveness and change. Topics include the study of intervention strategy and application skills. Prerequisites:  LDR 5003, LDR 5023


LDR 5083 CONFLICT RESOLUTION FOR LEADERS 3 CR web icon

Conflict is a fact of everyday professional and personal life.  If conflict is mishandled, it can be a source of considerable stress and lead to lost productivity.  Much of the success and satisfaction we find in life is determined by how we respond to conflict.  Leaders especially must respond well in conflict situations and should willingly accept the consequences of their conflict responses.  This course explores theories, methods, skills, and practices associated with successfully engaging in the dynamics of conflict interactions. Prerequisites:  LDR 5043, LDR 5063

LDR 5203 LEADERSHIP ETHICS, CULTURE, AND POLITICS 3 CR web icon
This course compares and contrasts the disciplines of leadership with an emphasis on fostering organizational culture and personal ethics. Topics will include historical and contemporary leadership theories applied across a wide variety of organizational contexts. Prerequisites: LDR 5043, LDR 5063

LDR 5223 ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNCATIONS FOR LEADERS 3 CR web icon
This course is designed to examine the theoretical and applied literature in the field of organizational communication relevant to organizational leadership. The different perspectives on organizational theory, the classical, systems approach, cultural, etc., will be studied and compared. In addition, such applied topics as organizational socialization, conflict, and the impact of technology on organizational communications will be investigated. Prerequisites:  LDR 5083, LDR 5203

LDR 5243 INTERNATIONAL LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
This course is designed to develop a cross-cultural awareness and multi-cultural competency. Using theoretical frameworks, students will examine their own culture, compare it with other cultures, and develop strategies for working successfully in multi-cultural situations. Emphasis will be on developing intercultural understanding, leadership, and problem solving skills when working with people from other cultures. The importance of communication is examined and how cultural style may impact perception, effective communication, and ultimately work performance. Other specific related issues will be discussed with varying degree of coverage, including developing skills to lead diverse employees, coaching/mentoring, and managing change. Prerequisites: LDR 5083, LDR 5203

LDR 6003 FUNDAMENTALS OF Global BUSINESS LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
This course provides students with a practical but intellectually challenging roadmap to their development as international business leaders. Different challenges and insights provided by leaders from industry and government enable students to explore leadership as a concept and as a vocation. Students will understand the dynamics of the worldwide marketplace, evaluate the different dimensions of international business, and examine leadership traits and skills managers must possess to effectively lead in rapidly expanding and volatile global economy. They will study management practices of global leaders while identifying the drivers of international business. Students will learn how to recognize and how to work through many of the barriers, challenges, and differences of international business to become global leaders. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6023 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING AND ECONOMICS FOR LEADERS 3 CR web icon
Post W.W.II, the trend toward freer trade and accelerating technological change, has been altering the world's economic landscape via the process of globalization. The recent drift toward regionalism (e.g., unifying European and North American markets), the collapse and subsequent restructuring of many of the world's national economies such as in the Soviet and Eastern European economies, have served as massive economic experiments. Global recession and recovery have been studies to glean what has worked and what has failed in each of these examples yielding critical information for future marketing strategies. This course is designed to introduce some of the key issues of these international events that can be incorporated into multinational marketing. This class will focus on issues involved in marketing products and services across national boundaries. Culture, economic arrangements, technical standards, currency movements, language, religion, ideology, politics, distance and conflicting interpretations of national and global interests combine to complicate the administration of marketing's familiar 4-Ps cross-nationally. This course uses a combination of lectures, global marketing cases, discussion, and mini projects to examine specific issues currently involved in multinational marketing strategies. In addition, students will study the concepts of international finance (international monetary relations) and financial policies, international loans, balance of payments accounting, exchange rates, reserve and payments currencies, and international liquidity. Of particular interest is the impact of the U.S. economy of international financial developments. Balance of payments adjustment under fixed and flexible exchange rates and under the gold standard will be considered in detail. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6043 GLOBAL LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT FOR LEADERS 3 CR web icon
This course demands from students to develop cutting-edge logistics strategies to gain competitive advantage and a comprehensive understanding of managing logistics in a global setting. It covers principles of logistics activities in international business with special emphasis on transportation, global sourcing, customs issues, import-export opportunities, customs documentation, and the role of government in international transactions, customer service, information technology, and global supply chain management. Special emphasis is placed on current events and their effect on the marketing and logistics activities of global organizations. Students will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of the location of different facilities in a global context, and the tangible and intangible resources required for effective supply chain decision making. They will coordinate logistics activities across supply chains and choose between different options for effectively delivering logistics services. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6063 INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This course is designed to provide a capstone or conclusion to the International Studies Concentration. Its objective is to provide an opportunity to conduct independent research on an International Studies theme, analyzing a contemporary policy issue. The topic will be selected by the students, so that they can integrate the linkages between the themes, areas, and disciplinary foci of study, and apply the analytical frameworks, professional writing, research, and leadership skills acquired during the program. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses LDR 6003

LDR 6103 INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL REGULATORY AFFAIRS 3 CR web icon
This course surveys government oversight of devices and biotechnology derived products; laws and regulations that apply to development, testing and production. It also addresses the responsibilities of a regulatory affairs specialist the regulatory setting. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6123 PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
This course covers product development and manufacturing concerns (such as quality control, scale-up, good manufacturing practices (GMPs) and quality systems), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration inspection process, and FDA regulatory actions. Focus on the QSIT (Quality System Inspection Technique). Prerequisites: All LDR core courses, LDR 6103 or admission to the concentration

LDR 6143 PRODUCT TESTING, EVALUATION, CLINICAL TRIALS, AND POST-MARKET ISSUES 3 CR web icon
This course focuses on post-marketing requirements, reporting and enforcement actions. Emphasis is on inspection (internal and by regulators) preparation, conduct and follow-up actions. It also introduces the major concepts under which clinical trials are designed and run, including the phases of clinical trials, study design and statistical concepts, the role of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Institutional Review Boards, the Code of Federal Regulations and ethical principles. Post-marketing surveillance and studies, and reimbursement and economics of biomedical interventions are discussed. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses, LDR 6103 or admission to the concentration

LDR 6163 BIOMEDICAL REGULATORY AFFAIRS CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This course provides a practical experience to ensure that participants can conceptualize the shepherding of new biomedical products through regulatory, clinical and quality assurance aspects. Students work on projects of their choice under the guidance of an adviser. The final report will consist of a comprehensive regulatory strategy work plan for a product, using knowledge gained in the concentration-area courses. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses, LDR 6103

LDR 6203 NONPROFIT SECTOR FOUNDATIONS 3 CR web icon
An examination of the social and legal history of nonprofit organizations in the United States, to develop an historical perspective and a sense of magnitude, scope, and functions of the nonprofit sector and its relationships with business and government. This course will first explore the theoretical bases upon which social scientists have sought to understand the role of the nonprofit sector in our economy and in our political and social systems, and will explore the issues that will shape the future of the sector. Learners will also receive a basic grounding in the laws and regulations governing nonprofit organizations. Content will include the procedures for incorporating, reporting, and maintaining tax-exempt status as a nonprofit organization, a familiarity with legal principles and research methods, and an overview of the legal, regulatory, and policy issues facing contemporary nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6223 Economic SUSTAINABILITY OF NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course will provide the student with an understanding of basic principles of micro-economic analysis, put the nonprofit sector into perspective within the framework of the overall economy, and present strategies for organizational sustainability that incorporate fund development programs, private, corporate and government funding streams. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6243 QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION PLANNING AND EVALUATION 3 CR web icon
This course will give students working knowledge of data analysis, statistical concepts, use of computers, research designs for program planning and evaluation, and quantitative techniques for problem solving. The intent is to ensure that executives and leaders are able to effectively utilize and interpret statistical data, technical reports, research findings, and evaluation studies, and employ basic quantitative methods in their own analysis of programs, problems and policies. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6263 NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION STUDIES CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This course is the capstone course for all students in the Nonprofit Concentration. The capstone is a special project conducted in a nonprofit organization. It may be arranged within the organization in which the student is employed or in another organization which agrees to work with the student on a project of mutual interest. It is anticipated that most projects will be arranged within agencies in which students currently work. The capstone experience affords each student an opportunity to go through a process that will generate a solution(s) to a critical problem or issue for the organization.  Prerequisites:  All LDR core courses, LDR 6203

LDR 6303 POLITICAL MARKETING AND MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon

This course empowers students to create an interdisciplinary strategy to analyze constituent priorities and community resources, effectively engage media and society in framing public debate, and facilitate effective political leadership that can implement chosen policies. The principles of power and leadership are explored, featuring effective state and national political leaders who discuss their principles of leadership and engagement. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6323 LEADING COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT 3 CR web icon

This course provides the student with a deeper understanding of the major components and principles of civic leadership. Classroom activities examine the leadership process in the context of community and society. This approach encourages ordinary citizens to take responsibility, organize, and build coalitions for the purpose of productive public discussion. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration


LDR 6343 PUBLIC GOVERNANCE AND SERVANT LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon

This course explores the essential elements of effective governance within the framework of servant leadership, which is essential for the survival of a democratic Republic. The legal, moral, and ethical implications of these elements will be in both historical and contemporary contexts. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6363 POLITICAL LEADERSHIP & CIVIC ENGAGEMENT CAPSTONE COURSE 3 CR web icon

This course is the capstone course for all students in the Political Leadership & Civic Engagement Concentration.   The capstone is a special project conducted within a local, state, or national community setting. It may be arranged within the organization in which the student is employed or in another organization which agrees to work with the student on a project of mutual interest. The capstone experience affords each student an opportunity to apply the skills, knowledge, and abilities gained through the leadership core and concentration-area content courses in a process that will generate a solution(s) to, or facilitate substantive public debate of a critical problem or issue. Prerequisites: All LDR Core Courses, All Political Leadership & Civic Engagement Concentration applied skills courses  

LDR 6403 FUNDAMENTALS OF FORESIGHT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP 3 CR web icon

This course will cover the fundamentals of broad topics in entrepreneurship, including human dimension of entrepreneurship, nature and role of entrepreneurship, economics of entrepreneurship, and corporate entrepreneurship. Students will gain a basic understanding of the entrepreneurial process of venture creation and innovation or the art and skill of finding viable new-business opportunities and the resources needed to develop and profit from them. In addition, students will examine the marketing, management, operations and financial functions needed to successfully start-up a new business whether a sole-proprietorship, partnership or division of a corporation. An emphasis will be placed on foresight, where students will utilize current analytical reports to foresee future events and outcomes, and then acting in accordance so as to arrive at the future in a desired state. They will accomplish this by applying creative and innovative thinking and work as a team to develop new ideas and scenarios around selected contemporary issues. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6423 FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR NEW VENTURES 3 CR web icon

The course focuses on business start-ups, providing an intensive introduction to business planning from the defining of a “primary vision” through market size assessment and strategic operations planning, to the financing, staffing and implementation of the new venture. Course includes readings on entrepreneurship, case studies of both small and large examples of successful new ventures and student fieldwork. Software available to help business planning will be introduced for hands-on use. Students will each prepare a formal business plan for new ventures. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6443 BUSINESS AND MARKETING PLANS FOR NEW VENTURES 3 CR web icon

The core of this course provides the theoretical and practical skills required to produce a comprehensive business plan integrating marketing, organizational behavior and financial planning via a flexible corporate strategy and it focuses on marketing planning and emphasizes the analysis of customer needs as well as company and competitor capabilities. This analysis forms the basis of a sound marketing strategy that provides value to customers in a way superior to competitors. Among other topics, students will discuss strategic and managerial analysis and securing start-up financing for new ventures. They will learn how to deliver the marketing strategy through the development of an integrated marketing program covering product offerings, pricing, promotion, and distribution and how to perform presentation of a professional business plan. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6463 GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSIP  CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon

This course is designed to provide a capstone or conclusion to the Strategic Foresight and Entrepreneurship Concentration. The emphasis in this course is for students to develop the ability to create and grow a global venture. Students will apply the knowledge and skills acquired in their courses to the work environment using the business plan model. Along with the aspects and characteristics of global entrepreneurs and the global entrepreneurship process, concepts of creativity, innovation and opportunity analysis are discussed both in individual and corporate setting as are global ethics, corporate governance, social enterprise and entrepreneurship. Student will develop a specific business idea, then examine the discussed concepts and include political risk, market opportunity, and operating conditions of their international market destination. Business plan is developed using market research options, entry modes, resource allocation, financial projections, and overall strategy for new ventures. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses, LDR 6403

LDR 6503 FOUNDATIONS OF INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon

This course will orient instructional leadership within the multiple contexts of child development, diverse learning environments, and an ever-changing political landscape. Students will explore current educational issues and use them to frame approaches to the continual improvement of academic instruction. Prerequisites: All LDR Core Courses or admission to Concentration

LDR 6523 DESIGNING, MANAGING, AND MONITORING STANDARDS-DRIVEN CURRICULUM 3 CR web icon

This course will guide students in utilizing state standards frameworks to make sound decisions about what is important for students to learn; create, assess. select, and adapt a rich and varied collection of materials and strategies to support learning; and base their instruction on ongoing assessment. Prerequisites: All LDR Core Courses or admission to Concentration

LDR 6543 SYSTEMATIC IMPROVEMENT OF INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES 3 CR web icon

This course leads students through reflective and observational processes they can use to regularly analyze evaluate, reflect on, and strengthen the effectiveness and quality of their practice, and use their findings to advance knowledge and practice in their field. Strategies for mentoring new teachers and engaging in action research will be explored and applied. Prerequisites: All LDR Core Courses or admission to Concentration

LDR 6563 INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP CAPSTONE COURSE 3 CR web icon

This course is the capstone course for all students in the Instructional Leadership Concentration.   The capstone is a special project conducted within an existing educational setting. It may be arranged within the organization in which the student is employed or in another organization which agrees to work with the student on a project of mutual interest. The capstone experience affords each student an opportunity to apply the skills, knowledge, and abilities gained through the leadership core and concentration-area content courses in a process that will generate a solution(s) to or facilitate substantive consideration of a current educational need or issue. Prerequisites: All LDR Core Courses All Instructional Leadership Concentration applied skills courses

LDR 6603 LEADING THE SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS 3 CR web icon
This course emphasizes the three aspects of sustainable business that improve a firm's long-term performance: managing risks (regulatory, reputation, litigation, and market), values-driven leadership, and recognizing market opportunities created by environmental and social challenges. Students will learn how to articulate the business case for sustainability, develop and lead internal and external coalitions needed to drive organizational change, and implement metrics for measuring progress and providing accountability. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6623 BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
In this course, students will gain expertise, enhance skills and broaden perspectives on environmental and natural resource management and leadership. As managerial effectiveness is central to environmental leadership, this course focuses on the development of management and leadership skills including decision-making, motivation, working in teams, organizational cultures, organizational design, and change management. Student will acquire cutting-edge environmental thinking providing them with the ability to make difficult environmental management decisions and effectively respond to environmental issues. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6643 SUSTAINABILITY AND BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 3 CR web icon
The primary objective of this course is to provide students with the skills, practical knowledge and experience in understanding needs not met effectively by current business practices and in developing innovative and proactive business strategies to address them. They will realize the sustainability challenges business and society are facing, how sustainability can be a business opportunity, and how businesses can increase their competitive advantage through sustainable strategies and innovation. The course emphasizes on the tools necessary to perform each business function (such as marketing, manufacturing, distribution, purchasing, HR R&D, information systems, finance, accounting) taking environmental and social implications into account. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6663 SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS Administration CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
The purpose of the integrative capstone course is to provide opportunities for students to apply the lessons learned in their previous courses to a real organization. Course instruction will center around a series of integrated modules that will focus on the practical implementation of all aspects of the curriculum. Under the direction of faculty, this capstone course engages the student to work with a business chosen by the student and the development of a plan to significantly improve its sustainable business practices. Students will explore interconnections between the strategic foundation of their client project and the cultural, sustainable and core purpose and goals of their client's organization within a global business context. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses LDR 6603

LDR 6803 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
This course is an in-depth study of a range of issues and related problems faced by practicing managers and leaders in the rapidly changing healthcare/health services delivery system. Special emphasis is placed on the issues relevant to current challenges, and this emphasis is of utilitarian value to the participants. Examples of issues include rural and urban healthcare, managed care, ethics of healthcare, integrating technology, and leadership styles and traits. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6823 LEGAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
The course studies the legal framework of health Services and healthcare delivery, as well as the ethical issues confronted by healthcare administrators in various healthcare settings. Topics will include licensure, medical malpractice, liability, insurance issues, legal standards for care, confidentiality of records (HIPPA), informed consent, and patient rights and patient advocacy. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6843 ORGANIZATION AND ECONOMICS OF HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS 3 CR web icon
The course provides an overview of the development of the current status of the healthcare system in the United States, its organizational structure, and operation of the various healthcare organizations, governmental as well as non-governmental, at the federal, state, and local levels. The course examines the structure and issues of the major Healthcare delivery systems including operation, marketing, financial management and sustainability of outpatient clinics, physician's offices, hospitals, long-term care facilities, self-help organizations, patient advocacy groups, accrediting agencies, and the insurance industry. Concepts addressed include demand (what physicians, patients and families want), supply, distribution, utilization of resources, market theories, and cost-benefit analysis, as they apply to healthcare as a service industry and including current and future payment systems for healthcare. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses or admission to the concentration

LDR 6863 HEALTHCARE LEADERSHIP CAPSTONE 3 CR web icon
This capstone course will provide students the opportunity to integrate and synthesize previous course work in leadership with healthcare content through the creation and implementation of applied programming or secondary/archival research. Prerequisites: All LDR core courses, LDR 6803

LE 103 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 CR
This course is an introduction to the criminal justice system that covers the processes, institutions and administration of justice in the United States. The course will concentrate on the purposes and history of the three primary parts of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, and corrections.

LE 153 JUVENILE JUSTICE 3 CR web icon
A comprehensive review of the nature and etiology of juvenile delinquency. The legal and philosophical basis of the juvenile justice process, procedures, and programs of prevention and rehabilitation.

LE 213 DIGITAL FORENSIC SCIENCE 3 CR
This course introduces the student to investigative techniques involving computers and other electronic devices. Topics include investigative procedures, computer hardware, data recovery methods and laws concerning digital devices. This course also covers how computers are used in investigations. Prerequisite: INF 103 (Same as INF 213 and FS 213)

LE 253 PROBATION, PAROLE & COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS 3 CR web icon
An introduction to community-based corrections within the criminal justice system. A comprehensive review of the philosophies, and practices, traditional and nontraditional approaches, and exemplary programs of the juvenile, and adult systems.

LE 263 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL LAW AND JUSTICE 3 CR web icon
A survey of the American criminal justice system, its legal bases, and the interrelationships between local, state and national agencies. Specific attention will be focused on criminal law, criminal liabilities and punishments.

LE 273 CRIMINAL PROCEDURES AND EVIDENCE 3 CR web icon
An examination of the various aspects of criminal procedures and their bases in the Constitution and in law. Topics include arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, and the exclusionary rule.

LE 313 POLICE ADMINISTRATION 3 CR
Historical and legal perspectives of policing in the United States. Issues include: organizational theory, police responsibilities, and leadership roles in contemporary law enforcement organizations. Prerequisite: LE 103

LE 343 CRIMINALISTICS AND CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATIONS I 3 CR web icon
Introduction to criminalistics and crime scene investigation. Methods of processing a crime scene: documentation, location, and collection of evidence, proper collection and handling procedures, selection, and presentation for analytical examination, and presentation of the process and findings in court. (Same as FS 343)

LE 351 CRIMINALISTICS AND CRIME SCENE LABORATORY CR 1
The study of types of chemical and physical analyses associated with crime scene investigations. Prerequisite: LE 343 (Same as FS 351)

LE 353 CRIMINALISTICS AND CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATIONS II 3 CR web icon
Advanced criminalistics and crime scene investigation. A detailed review of current methodology of collection, processing, and court presentation of evidence. Analysis of the roles of law enforcement and forensic scientists. Prerequisite: LE 343 (Same as FS 353)

LE 363 INSTITUTIONAL CORRECTIONS AND CORRECTIONAL LAW 3 CR web icon
A detailed review of penology and institutional corrections. A historical and contemporary perspective on jails and prisons. Rehabilitation and incarceration in both the adult and juvenile systems. A critical analysis of legislation and appellate decisions in correctional law for pretrial detainees and convicted and sentenced prisoners.

LE 423 CRIMINAL JUSTICE AGENCY ADMINISTRATION 3 CR web icon
A detailed examination of the unique blend of criminal justice and business/ public administration required in the administration of law enforcement, judicial and corrections agencies. A pragmatic analysis of public funding and utilization of local, state, and federal grants.

LE 433 CRIMINAL JUSTICE CAPSTONE DEMONSTRATION 3 CR web icon
This capstone course will provide students the opportunity to integrate and synthesize previous course work in Criminal Justice. In addition, to the Capstone Demonstration Project, students will be required to take the Major Field Test for Criminal Justice Majors. Prerequisite: All required coursework following the Psychology or Law Enforcement Core.

LE 453 TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 3 CR web icon
Selected topics in the area of criminal justice.

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MA 103 BUSINESS ALGEBRA 3 CR web icon
This course emphasizes the business applications of the following: rational algebraic expressions, quadratic equations, linear systems, synthetic division, determinants, exponents, radicals, and logarithms.

MA 113 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 3 CR web icon
Rational algebraic expressions, quadratic equations, non-linear systems, partial fractions, binomial expansion, synthetic division, determinants, exponents, radicals, logarithms.

MA 123 TRIGONOMETRY 3 CR
Trigonometric functions, identities, inverses, unit circle, solutions of triangles, trigonometric equations, complex numbers, radian measure, angular velocity.

MA 134 CALCULUS I 4 CR
Limits, continuity, differentiation, applications, definition of the integral, and fundamental theorem of integral calculus. Uses symbolic algebra software.

MA 153 ELEMENTS OF MATHEMATICS 3 CR web icon
Set operations, introduction to logic, mathematics of finance, introduction to probability and statistics. Not open to engineering/science majors.

MA 164 CALCULUS II 4 CR
Applications of integration, differentiation, and integration of transcendental functions and methods of integration, L'Hopital's rule, conic sections, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series. Uses symbolic algebra software. Prerequisite: "C" or better for MA 134 or equivalent

MA 173 APPLIED MATHEMATICS 3 CR web icon
Mathematics of finance, graphical solution of linear programming problems, introduction to differential and integral calculus with applications. Prerequisite: MA 103 or MA 113

MA 213 CALCULUS III 3 CR
Calculus of several variables, algebra and calculus of vectors, partial differentiation, directional derivative, multiple integrals, applications. Uses symbolic algebra software. Prerequisite: "C" or better in MA 164 or equivalent

MA 233 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 3 CR

Topics include: methods of solution for first and higher order differential equations, systems of ordinary differential equations, Laplace transforms, series solutions. Prerequisite:  MA 213

MA 253 STATISTICS 3 CR web icon
Laws of probability, frequency distributions, sampling, expectation and variance, normal and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, least squares, point, and interval estimates of parameters. Not open to engineering/ science majors. Prerequisite: MA 103 or MA 113

MA 323 OPERATIONS RESEARCH 3 CR
Computer solution of mathematical models for decision making. Linear, dynamic and integer programming, critical path scheduling, queuing theory, game theory, resource allocation. Prerequisites: INF 132 or CS 1113; MA 253 or MA 393

MA 393 PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS 3 CR
Finite probability, distributions, data analysis, sampling and sampling distributions, hypothesis tests, regression and correlation analysis, analysis of variance, design of experiments. Prerequisite: MA 213

MA 473 DISCRETE MATHEMATICS 3 CR
An introduction to discrete and combinatorial mathematics. Construction and analysis of mathematical models using combinatorics, graph theory and other discrete methods with application in a wide variety of areas. Prerequisite: MA 213

MAE 303 MECHANICS OF MACHINERY 3 CR

Topics include: study of the kinematics and dynamics of mechanisms. Fundamentals of displacement, velocity, and acceleration analysis of rigid bodies as a basis for the study of mechanisms. Motion analysis of linkages, cams, and gearing. Static and inertia force in machines. Balancing of rotating and reciprocating masses. Prerequisite: ES 223

MAE 343 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES AND EQUIPMENT 3 CR

An examination of commonly used engineering materials and the manufacturing processes and machines used in processing these materials. Demonstrations of: sand molding, metal casting, metal removal processes (turning, milling, drilling, grinding), and deformation processes. Introduction to CNC machining. Prerequisites: ES 233, ES243

MAE 353 MACHINE COMPONENT DESIGN 3 CR

Topics include: stress analysis of machine parts, combined stresses, working stress, stress concentration, theory of failure for both static and fatigue loadings, design of machine elements. Prerequisites: ES 233, ES 243; Corequisite: MA 313

MAE 463 MEASUREMENT LABORATORY 3 CR

Principles of dimensional measurement and the measurement of deflection, stress, strain, and vibration. Transducer theory and signal conditioning. Use of computer data acquisition and signal analysis. Analysis of experimental error and construction of test plans. Laboratory work leading to an experimental project. Prerequisites: ES 253, MA 393, MAE 353

MGT 313 HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course includes a discussion of policies, objectives, principles and organizational structure as they pertain to personnel work. The major activities of a personnel department such as recruiting, selecting, training, and employee relations are examined along with the impact of government laws and regulations on these activities.

MGT 323 LEADERSHIP 3 CR web icon
This course examines leadership, influence, and power across a variety of disciplines, with a strong emphasis on ethics. Historical, literary, and contemporary examples of successful leadership provide a framework for examining the theories and practice of leadership and power.

MGT 333 SUPERVISION 3 CR web icon
This course is intended for people who are, or plan to be, first line supervisors. Its purpose is to present basic principles that will assist in developing the talent needed to direct other people. Skill building cases and incidents are part of the course content. Prerequisite: MGT 363

MGT 343 HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT 3 CR web icon
This course is a study of processes, methods, theories, and current practices in training and staff development in business and organizational settings. The course focuses on practices that facilitate learning and change to achieve organizational objectives.

MGT 353 DESIGNING OPERATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course examines the central concepts of designing operations in both manufacturing and service enterprises. Topics include process strategy, location and layout strategy, job design, quality management, planning, productivity, and the design of goods and services. Prerequisites: MA 173 or permission of instructor

MGT 363 ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR 3 CR web icon
This course examines the manager's role in dealing with behavior at all organizational levels. It emphasizes the need for interpersonal and group skills. Applications of behavioral science concepts and findings to organizational situations are included. Topics include motivation, communications, leadership, conflict, and change. Prerequisites: COM 213, PSY 113, or permission of instructor

MGT 413 MANAGEMENT OF QUALITY 3 CR web icon
This course examines principles of quality management and continuous improvement in manufacturing and services enterprises. The focus is on using key quality tools, including statistical process control, pareto charts, flow charts, cause-effect diagrams, etc. Prerequisite: MGT 353, MA 253, or permission of instructor

MGT 443 MANAGING OPERATIONS 3 CR web icon
This course examines contemporary operations management principles and practices. Topics include project management, inventory management, aggregate planning, supply chain management, materials requirement planning, lean manufacturing, and just-in-time principles. Prerequisite: MGT 353 and MA 253 or permission of instructor

MGT 453 STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course requires a knowledge of all functional areas of business. It integrates these areas through analysis of case histories and related readings. Class discussion, presentations and written reports are used extensively. This course is the capstone business course and should be taken the last semester before graduation. Prerequisite: Completion of all business core courses

MGT 463 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 3 CR web icon
This course examines the preparatory steps necessary to launch a small business enterprise, as well as manage the everyday complexities of cash flow, marketing, staffing, pricing, purchasing, and advertising. Its purpose is to present the many competencies needed to operate a small business successfully in the competitive environment of the 21st century. Case analysis and personal interviews are the primary integral components of the course content. Prerequisites: AC 213, MK 303, FIN 303, MGT 353, MGT 363

MGT 473 CAPSTONE BUSINESS SIMULATION 3 CR web icon
This course through competitive simulations, will teach the importance of team work, strategic planning and the impact of decision-making within a business entity. Small teams will manage a business entity throughout the course. Teams will make and submit decisions regarding functional areas of the entity, including research and development, production, marketing, finance, and human resources. The decisions will then be analyzed and feedback given on how the decisions would have impacted their entity. Teams will be competing with other teams across the globe, and they will see immediately how their decisions position their given entity in that global business arena. Prerequisites: Completion of all business core courses or permission of the dean of the School of Professional Studies

MGT 493 SELECTED TOPICS 3 CR
Offered to treat specific or current business or management issues in depth Prerequisite: MGT 353, MGT 363 or permission of the instructor

MGT 523 COMMUNICATIONS, LEADERSHIP AND ETHICS 3 CR
This course examines leadership, influence, and power across a variety of disciplines with a strong emphasis on ethics. Historical, literary, and contemporary examples of successful leadership provide a framework for examining the theories and practice of leadership and power. This course requires substantial advanced critical thinking and writing. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

MGT 543 OPERATIONS STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This course examines the central role of operations in both manufacturing and service enterprises. Topics include quality management, design of goods and services, layout, scheduling, project management, inventory management, supply chain management, and purchasing activities within the firm. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

MK 303 MARKETING 3 CR web icon
The marketing activities necessary to provide goods and services to target customers are examined, as well as the role marketing plays in the social and economic system. The marketing variables of product, promotion, placement, and price are considered in the context of strategic planning, implementation, and control.

MK 313 RETAIL MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This is the study of the role of retailing in the domestic and international marketing process. A functional approach is taken in the study of retailing topics of placement, promotion, pricing, inventory control. Also examined are the consumer purchasing behavior and lifestyle profiles to understand growth of nontraditional channels.

MK 323 INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS 3 CR
The integrated approach to marketing communications is emphasized. Advertising, sales promotion, database/direct marketing, public relations, sponsorship/event marketing, support media, trade promotions, internet marketing, personal selling, and their coordination through a common brand and theme are investigated. Prerequisite: MK 303 or permission of the instructor

MK 333 BUYER BEHAVIOR 3 CR
Studies in this course include consumer and organizational buying behavior, as well as determinants of this behavior. Consumer characteristics, including attitudes and behaviors, processing of information, as well as consumer cultural, psychological and communication theories are also studied. Course also examines industrial perspectives; the unique aspects of organizational markets
and how they differ from individual consumer behavior.

MK 343 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING 3 CR
This course provides a detailed examination into the principles and practices of international marketing as it applies to today's global economy. In-depth studies and analysis will be made of trade and commercial policies and practices, as well as international product adaptation, promotion, distribution, and pricing strategies. The student will examine the international marketing manager's role in the development of an export marketing program. Prerequisites: BA 343, MK 303 or permission of the instructor

MK 423 PERSONAL SELLING 3 CR
This course examines the impact of personal selling in today's competitive marketplace. Topics examined are motivation, account selection, compensation, seller's role in the economy, and personality variables. Prerequisite: MK 303 or permission of the instructor

MK 433 MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This is the study of the planning, implementation, and outcomes of a firm's marketing program. Content will focus on identification, analysis, and reviews of internal/external factors associated with marketing policies and programs. Prerequisites: MK 303

MK 463 MARKETING RESEARCH 3 CR
This is the study of techniques and approaches associated with researching marketing topics. It includes consumer research, market analysis, product research, advertising research, and sales analysis. Prerequisites: MK 303 or concurrently, or permission of the instructor

MK 473 E-MARKETING 3 CR web icon
Electronic technologies are applied to the functions of marketing which are product, price, placement, and promotion. E-marketing transforms traditional business using new models that add customer value and increase profitability. The outcome of the course will be the creation of an E-marketing plan. Prerequisites: MK 303

MK 483 SENIOR SEMINAR IN MARKETING 3 CR
This is an integrative capstone course which brings together all the functional areas of marketing. The focus is on decision-making and problems in marketing strategy. Students will study marketing considerations and responses to changes in the customer, legal, trade, technological and regulatory environments. This course includes the preparation and organization of a comprehensive marketing plan. Prerequisite: MK 303

MK 493 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING 3 CR
Offered to treat specific or current marketing issues in depth. Prerequisite: MK 303, permission of the instructor

MK 503 STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT 3 CR
This course examines the collective marketing activities (pricing, promotion, placement, product) as they relate to the target market. The strategic planning process and how it relates to the overall profitability of the marketing department and a corporate structure will be studied. Prerequisite: Graduate standing

MUS 273 MUSIC & CULTURE 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the music of the Western world, including musical styles of the past and styles and forms of contemporary music literature. Previous music training not a prerequisite. This course explores how people define, create, value, and use music in cultures around the world. The basic musical elements of rhythm, melody, timbre, texture, harmony, and form are explored through this multicultural approach to music appreciation.


P

PH 154 COLLEGE PHYSICS I 3 CR
An algebra-based introduction to the concept and application of Newton's Law, linear and rotational motion, work, energy, and momentum, solids and fluids, heat, vibrations, waves and sounds. Experimental investigation of selected topics. Prerequisites: MA 113, MA 123

PH 164 COLLEGE PHYSICS II 3 CR
An algebra-based introduction to the concept and application of Coulomb's Law, capacitance, DC electric circuits, magnetism, electromagnetic induction, optics and optical instruments, and relativity and quantum physics. Experimental investigation of selected topics. Prerequisites: PH 154

PH 224 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I 3-2-4

Underlying principles of measurement, vectors, translatory, rotary, uniform, circular, and harmonic motion, work, power, energy, and physical properties of liquids, solids, gases, and statics. Also the fundamentals of heat: thermometry, expansion of liquids, solids and gases, calorimetry, heat transfer, elementary thermodynamics, and fluids. Experimental investigation of selected topics.

Prerequisite: MA 134

PH 234 UNIVERSITY PHYSICS II 3-2-4

Study of vibrations and wave motion: different types of simple harmonic motion, sound. Also the fundamentals of electric fields, Gauss’s Law, electric potential, capacitance, magnetism, direct, and alternating currents and circuits. Electromagnetic wave propagation and optics. Experimental investigation of selected topics. Prerequisites: MA 164, PH 224

PHL 203 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 3 CR web icon
A study of the perennial problems of philosophy, such as the nature of knowledge, the role of the self, the existence of God, and the function of science. The contributions of the great thinkers of history to these problems are presented so that the student may find aid in forming his or her own philosophy.

PHL 251 ANCIENT GREECE FROM THE PERSIAN THROUGH PELOPONNESIAN WARS 1 CR
An examination of the culture of Athens and Sparta during the 5th century B.C., concentrating on the Persian and Peloponnesian wars and their lasting effects on Western Civilization. (Same as HIS 251)

PHL 313 ETHICS 3 CR web icon
A study of ethical language, methods of justifying ethical decisions, and types of ethical value systems, with emphasis on practical applications in terms of personal and social morality.

PHL 323 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION 3 CR web icon
An inquiry into the nature of religious experience, activity and belief. An examination of the concepts of God, freedom, and immortality as well as the relationship of religious knowledge to artistic and scientific knowledge.

PHL 333 ART, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY 3 CR
An interdisciplinary effort to place modern technology within a social, cultural, and historical context. Prerequisite: ENG 113 or ENG 133 (Same as SOC 333)

PHL 343 LOGIC 3 CR web icon
An examination of the function of language and the nature of meanings. Valid and invalid reasoning, deductive and inductive methods. Particular emphasis will be given to the application of formal techniques to the evaluation of arguments in everyday settings. The course is argument and language oriented. Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing

PL 4003 LEGAL CAPSTONE EXPERIENCE 3 CR
The legal capstone experience will provide the opportunity to utilize the skills and knowledge the student has attained in their previous coursework in a concerted effort to prepare for and gain law school admission.

PSY 113 PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
Introduction to the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Course covers all of the major areas within psychology, including development, learning, intelligence, personality, attitudes, altered states of consciousness, abnormal behavior, and psychotherapy.

PSY 303 RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An introduction to research methods employed in psychology, with special emphasis on experimental design. Topics include between and within-subjects designs, quasi-experimental designs, as well as research ethics and procedures for controlling extraneous variables. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 313 TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
Survey, in detail, of one of the major areas of study within psychology. The course changes each semester with the specific topic of study announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 323 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
Survey of abnormal psychology, including such topics as clinical assessment, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, age-related problems, depression, sexual dysfunctions, psychotherapy, and related legal and ethical questions arising within clinical psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 333 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY 3 CR web icon
An introductory survey of problems, methods, and theories; personality development and motivation, with emphasis on the normal contemporary theories of adjustment and idiodynamics. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 343 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the measurement and principles of human interaction and group behavior including attitude change, prejudice, attraction, love, altruism, aggression, conformity, group dynamics, crowding, and other current social issues. Prerequisite: PSY 113 (Same as SOC 343)

PSY 353 CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An investigation into the development stages within the life of a human being, from birth through adolescence, with emphasis on the origin of personality and factors related to intellectual growth. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 363 COUNSELING 3 CR web icon

Examines the theory and practice of counseling with a corporate or social service setting. Exposure to a variety of therapeutic techniques. Experiences first-hand the complexities of the human mind through a case-study approach. Direct versus indirect forms of interventions are explored.  Prerequisite:  PSY 333 (Same as SOC 363)

PSY 373 POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An examination of the role of group dynamics and personality variables in contemporary political issues, including leadership and power, political attitudes, current social movements, conflict resolution, coalition formation, cross-cultural comparisons of political attitudes, and other issues. Prerequisites: GOV 113 or PSY 113 (Same as GOV 373)

PSY 383 FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR web icon
A pragmatic review of the psychological and sociological theories and practices which seek to evaluate and analyze deviant human behavior and environments which precipitate criminal conduct. An introduction into the profiling and prediction of criminals and criminal behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 403 HUMAN SEXUALITY 3 CR web icon
A survey of the historical, cultural, and psychological origins of sex differences as they relate to sex role identity, stereotyping, and related behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 413 THE PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION 3 CR web icon
A study of the psychological and sociological factors relating to the problems of addiction. Special attention will be given to the effects which alcohol and other drugs have upon fetuses, children, adults, families, and communities. Prerequisite: PSY 113

PSY 423 COUNSELING THEORIES AND PRACTICES 3 CR web icon
A thorough review of contemporary approaches to counseling. This course examines the major current theories and practices in psychotherapy in detail. Prerequisite: PSY 323

PSY 443 ADVANCED FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR
An in-depth study of the etiology of criminal behavior. A critical analysis of mentally disordered, psychopathic, and sexually disordered offenders. Students acquire profiling and prediction skills. Prerequisites: PSY 383

PSY 473 PSYCHOLOGY CAPSTONE DEMONSTRATION 3 CR web icon
This capstone will provide students the opportunities to integrate and synthesize previous course work in psychology. In addition to the Capstone demonstration Project, students will be required to take the Major Field Test for Psychology Majors. Prerequisite: All required coursework in the Psychology Core.

PSY 400X INDEPENDENT STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY VARIES (1-4 HRS.)
Credit earned through directed reading, independent study, research, or supervised field work. Maximum four hours credit. Prerequisite: Permission of Dean of the School of Professional Studies

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S

SOC 103 PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 3 CR web icon
A presentation of the basic concepts and principles of sociology, designed to develop a system of thought about the nature of society and major special problems, such as ethnic patterns, social stratification, youth, educational, and religious institutions.

SOC 243 ECONOMICS OF SOCIAL ISSUES 3 CR web icon
An economic analysis of social issues, such as the problems of pollution, poverty, crime, and the use of drugs. A study of the economic consequences of various social and economic policies, population pressures and related energy and pollution problems.  Prerequisite ECO 213 (Same as ECO 243)

SOC 313 TOPICS IN SOCIOLOGY 3 CR web icon
Selected topics in sociological content such as criminology, minority groups, urbanization, and the like. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: SOC 103

SOC 323 THE FAMILY 3 CR web icon
An analysis of problems and relationships in the family setting: divorce, mobility, generation differences, changing role of women and youth, delinquency, cross cultural patterns. Prerequisite: PSY 113 or SOC 103

SOC 333 ART, SOCIETY AND TECHNOLOGY 3 CR web icon
An interdisciplinary effort to place modern technology within a social, cultural and historical context. Prerequisite: ENG113 or ENG 133 (same as PHL 333)

SOC 343 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 3 CR
An introduction to the measurement and principles of human interaction and group behavior, including attitude change, prejudice, attraction, love, altruism, aggression, conformity, group dynamics, crowding, and other current social issues. Prerequisite: PSY 113 (Same as PSY 343)

SOC 363 COUNSELING 3 CR web icon

Examines the theory and practice of counseling with a corporate or social service setting. Exposure to a variety of therapeutic techniques. Experiences first-hand the complexities of the human mind through a case-study approach. Direct versus indirect forms of interventions are explored.  Prerequisite:  PSY 333 (Same as SOC 363)

SP 102 INTRODUCTION TO THEATER 2 CR
Understanding the roles of playwrights, actors, directors, designers, and audiences within the "living art" of theater. Demonstrates the relationship between art and culture through the study of, participation in, and viewing of theater.

SP 203 EFFECTIVE SPEAKING 3 CR web icon
Application of communication principles to improve extemporaneous public speaking and listening skills. Considers principles of audience analysis and rhetorical invention, worthy and effective evidence and inductive reasoning, speaker and source credibility, organization and outlining, effective speaker audience interaction, listening for comprehension, and critical listening. Prerequisite: ENG 113 or ENG 133

SP 212 ORAL INTERPRETATION 3 CR

The techniques of oral interpretation, with emphasis on the selection and analysis of literature and the skill use of the voice and body for meaningful and aesthetic communication. Prerequisite ENG 153

SPN 103 SPANISH CONVERSATION I 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the Spanish language with an emphasis on functional conversation skills. Vocabulary development and pronunciation within communicative contexts are stressed. No previous study of Spanish is required.

SPN 113 SPANISH READING AND WRITING I 3 CR web icon
An introduction to the Spanish language with an emphasis on reading and writing in Spanish. Vocabulary development and the basics of Spanish structure are also covered. No previous study of Spanish is required.

SPN 123 SPANISH II 3 CR
A continuation of Spanish 113, integrating listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Basic grammar and Latin American and Spanish cultures are covered. Prerequisite: SPN 113


U

UE 101 UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE 1 CR web icon
This course offers resources for success in learning for students new to Trine University. This course will assist students in becoming more proficient learners, understanding self and others, and learning personal life skills. This course will present information about Trine University offices and services to familiarize students with resources and procedures.

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